Saturday, October 18, 2014

19th Sunday After Pentecost 19 October 2014

19th Sunday After Pentecost
19 October 2014

“For many are called, but few are chosen.”
Mt. 22:14
In today’s Gospel (Mt. 22:1-14), we see the continuation of Jesus’ parables in which He explains how the Kingdom of Heaven is made available to men, but they, for various reasons, do not accept the invitation of God. In today’s parable of the “Marriage Feast,” we see how the King gives a marriage feast for his son and invites guests to it. According to Bl. Dom Columba Marmion, OSB, this marriage feast by the king is actually the marriage feast of the Son of God who takes upon Himself a human nature. Pope St. Gregory the Great comments on the “Marriage Feast”: “...that the King made a marriage for His Son, in that, by the mystery of the Incarnation, He united the Church to Him. The womb of the Virgin was the nuptial-chamber of that Bridegroom, of whom the psalmist says (Ps. 18:6): ‘He hast set His tabernacle in the sun: and He, as a Bridegroom, cometh out of His bride-chamber.’” Gueranger, The Liturgical Life, Vol. 11, p. 419-20 In the Epistle to Ephesians, not in today’s Epistle (Eph.4:23-28), St. Paul writes about the Church being the bride of Christ: “Husbands, love your wives, just as Christ also loved the Church and delivered himself up for her, that he might sanctify her, cleansing her in the bath of water by means of his word; in order that he might present to himself the Church in all her glory, not having spot or wrinkle or any such thing, but that she might be holy and without blemish.” Eph. 5:25-7. The Church, that is all the souls united to Jesus Christ in baptism, is the bride of Christ who will be brought to the heavenly “marriage feast....without spot or wrinkle” at the end of their lives.

The Holiness of union with love in God
In his commentary on today’s Epistle Dom Prosper Gueranger writes in The Liturgical Life Vol. 11 about the holiness in the Blessed Trinity: “Let us call to mind how the holiness, which is in God, is His very truth living and harmonious, which is no other than the admirable concert of the Three divine Persons, united in love. We have seen that holiness, as far as it exists in us men, is also union, by infinite love, with the eternal and living Truth. The Word took a Body unto Himself in order to manifest in the Flesh this sanctifying and perfect truth ( cf. Jn. 1:14), of which He is the substantial expression ((cf. Heb. 1:3). His Humanity, sanctified directly by the plenitude of the divine life and truth, which dwell within Him (cf. Col. 2: 3, 9, 10), became the model, as well as the means, the way, of holiness to every creature ((cf. Jn. 14:6)....In Jesus, as the complement of His Incarnation, Wisdom aspires at uniting with herself all the members, also, of that human race, of which He is the Head (cf. Eph. 1:10), and First-born (cf. Col. 1:15-20); by Him the Holy Ghost, whose sacred fount He is (cf. Jn. 4:14), pours Himself out upon man, whereby to adapt him to his sublime vocation, and to consummate, in infinite love (which is Himself), that union of every creature with the divine Word. Thus it is that we verily partake of that life of God, whose existence and holiness are the knowledge and love of His own Word; thus it is that we are sanctified in truth (cf. Jn. 17:17) by the participation of that very holiness wherewith God is holy by nature.” Gueranger, p. 412

“...and put on the new man which has been created according to God in justice, and holiness of truth.” Eph. 4:23
St. Paul, in urging his followers to put on the new man in truth, shows us that the unifying principle in Jesus Christ for all of His members is the Holy Spirit of truth and love. Dom Gueranger comments on this unifying principle: “’May they all be one, as Thou, Father, in Me, and I in Thee, said Jesus to His eternal Father, that they also may be one in us. I have given unto them the glory (that is to say, the holiness) which Thou hast given unto me, that they may be one as we also are one; I in them and Thou in Me, that they may be consummated (that is, be made perfect) in unity.’” (cf. 17:21-28) ...By that sublime prayer, He explained what He had previously been saying: ‘I sanctified Myself for them, that they, also may sanctified in truth.’” (cf. Jn. 17:19) Gueranger, p.413

“...bond of peace”
In the Epistle to the Ephesians, St. Paul writes about being faithful to one’s calling: “...with all humility and meekness, with patience, bearing with one another in love careful to preserve the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace: one body and one Spirit.” Eph. 4:2-4 This unity of the Spirit is, according to Dom Gueranger, the principle for all: “It is the crowning of the sublimest vocations in the order of grace as well as the foundation and reason of all God’s commandments; so truly so, indeed, that, if we are commanded to abstain from lying, and to speak the truth to them that live with us, the motive is that we are members one of another.” Gueranger, p. 413-4 This is why St. Paul in today’s Epistle tells us: “Wherefore, put away lying and speak truth each one with his neighbour, because we are members of one another. ‘Be angry and do not sin.’ (Ps. 4:5); do not let the sun go down upon your anger: do not give place to the devil. He who was wont to steal, let him steal no longer, but rather let him labour, working with his hands at what is good, that he may have something to share with him who suffers need.” Eph. 4:25-8 Only those who keep “the bond of peace” with one another can belong to Christ and enter the heavenly “marriage feast.”

Heavenly Marriage Feast
Today’s Gospel is similar to the Gospel of Second Sunday after Pentecost (Lk. 14:16-24) which has “The Great Supper” to which many were invited. St. Matthew’s “Marriage Feast” is fuller in details with a revelation of the true aim of the Church. Dom Gueranger, in comparing the two gospels, says: “The certain man who made a great supper, and invited many, has become the King, who makes a marriage feast for His Son, and, in this marriage, gives us an image of the kingdom of heaven. The world’s history, too, has been developing, as we gather from the terms respectively used by the two Evangelists. Those who were first invited, and contented themselves with declining the kindness of the Master of the house, have grown in their impious ingratitude; laying hands on the messengers sent them by the loving kindness of the King, they treat them with contumely, and put them to death! We have seen the merited punishment inflicted on these deicides, by this Man, who was God Himself, the Father of Israel, now become King of the Gentiles: we have seen how He sent his armies to destroy them and burn their city. And now at last, in spite of the refusal of the invited of Juda, in spite of the treacherous opposition put them against the celebration of the nuptials of the Son of God, all things are ready for the marriage, and the banquet-hall is filled with guests.” Gueranger, p.417

Wedding Garment of Sanctifying Grace
The spiritual meaning of the “Parable of the Marriage Feast” contains the need for sanctifying grace to enter the heavenly “marriage feast.” All have been invited from the highways and crossroads of the land. When the King enters, he notices one without a wedding garment. This wedding garment signifies the need on the part of the soul to have sanctifying grace. In the spiritual sense, the man has not kept the “bond of peace” because he has not kept the Commandments and has offended God and his neighbour by his sins; therefore, the king has his hands and feet bound and casts him out into the darkness “where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.” Mt. 22:13 As we can see from today’s parable of the “Marriage Feast,” “...many are called, but few are chosen.” Mt. 22:14 All have the invitation, but not all accept the invitation. It is they who refuse to come either by rejecting Jesus Christ or by refusing to repent after disobeying God’s Commandments. We can be assured that we will be chosen for the heavenly “marriage feast” if we persevere in “the bond of peace” with love of God and our neighbour.

“The Little Number of Those Who Are Saved” Part III
by St. Leonard of Port Maurice
The Words of Holy Scripture
But why seek out the opinions of the Fathers and theologians, when Holy Scripture settles the question so clearly? Look in to the Old and New Testaments, and you will find a multitude of figures, symbols and words that clearly point out this truth: very few are saved. In the time of Noah, the entire human race was submerged by the Deluge, and only eight people were saved in the Ark. Saint Peter says, "This ark was the figure of the Church," while Saint Augustine adds, "And these eight people who were saved signify that very few Christians are saved, because there are very few who sincerely renounce the world, and those who renounce it only in words do not belong to the mystery represented by that ark." The Bible also tells us that only two Hebrews out of two million entered the Promised Land after going out of Egypt, and that only four escaped the fire of Sodom and the other burning cities that perished with it. All of this means that the number of the damned who will be cast into fire like straw is far greater than that of the saved, whom the heavenly Father will one day gather into His barns like precious wheat.
I would not finish if I had to point out all the figures by which Holy Scripture confirms this truth; let us content ourselves with listening to the living oracle of Incarnate Wisdom. What did Our Lord answer the curious man in the Gospel who asked Him, "Lord, is it only a few to be saved?" Did He keep silence? Did He answer haltingly? Did He conceal His thought for fear of frightening the crowd? No. Questioned by only one, He addresses all of those present. He says to them: "You ask Me if there are only few who are saved?" Here is My answer: "Strive to enter by the narrow gate; for many, I tell you, will seek to enter and will not be able." Who is speaking here? It is the Son of God, Eternal Truth, who on another occasion says even more clearly, "Many are called, but few are chosen." He does not say that all are called and that out of all men, few are chosen, but that many are called; which means, as Saint Gregory explains, that out of all men, many are called to the True Faith, but out of them few are saved. Brothers, these are the words of Our Lord Jesus Christ. Are they clear? They are true. Tell me now if it is possible for you to have faith in your heart and not tremble.
Salvation in the Various States of Life
But oh, I see that by speaking in this manner of all in general, I am missing my point. So let us apply this truth to various states, and you will understand that you must either throw away reason, experience and the common sense of the faithful, or confess that the greater number of Catholics is damned. Is there any state in the world more favorable to innocence in which salvation seems easier and of which people have a higher idea than that of priests, the lieutenants of God? At first glance, who would not think that most of them are not only good but even perfect; yet I am horror-struck when I hear Saint Jerome declaring that although the world is full of priests, barely one in a hundred is living in a manner in conformity with state; when I hear a servant of God attesting that he has learned by revelation that the number of priests who fall into hell each day is so great that it seemed impossible to him that there be any left on earth; when I hear Saint Chrysostom exclaiming with tears in his eyes, "I do not believe that many priests are saved; I believe the contrary, that the number of those who are damned is greater."
Look higher still, and see the prelates of the Holy Church, pastors who have the charge of souls. Is the number of those who are saved among them greater than the number of those who are damned? Listen to Cantimpre; he will relate an event to you, and you may draw the conclusions. There was a synod being held in Paris, and a great number of prelates and pastors who had the charge of souls were in attendance; the king and princes also came to add luster to that assembly by their presence. A famous preacher was invited to preach. While he was preparing his sermon, a horrible demon appeared to him and said, "Lay your books aside. If you want to give a sermon that will be useful to these princes and prelates, content yourself with telling them on our part, 'We the princes of darkness thank you, princes, prelates, and pastors of souls, that due to your negligence, the greater number of the faithful are damned; also, we are saving a reward for you for this favor, when you shall be with us in Hell.'" (To be continued next week)








Saturday, October 11, 2014

Seventeenth Sunday after Pentecost 5th October 2014

Seventeenth Sunday after Pentecost
5 October 2014

“I therefore, the prisoner in the Lord, exhort you to walk in the manner worthy of the calling with which you were called, with all humility and meekness, with patience, bearing with one another in love,...” Eph. 4:1-2
In today’s readings, the Church teaches us that the vocation of the Christian is to love God and one another. It is the most exalted of vocations because it leads to union with God here on earth and the guarantee of our eternal union with God in heaven. Dom Gueranger in his The Liturgical Year Vol. 11 sums up in the Epistle (Ephesians 4:1-6) St. Paul’s teaching on the Church “...the dignity of her children. She beseeches them to correspond, in a becoming manner, to their high vocation. This vocation, this call, which God gives us is, as we have been so often told, the call, or invitation, made to the human family to come to the sacred nuptials of divine union; it is the vocation given to us to reign in heaven with the Word, who has made Himself our Spouse, and our Head (cf. Eph. 2:5).” Gueranger, p. 374 “I, therefore, the prisoner in the Lord, exhort you to walk in the manner worthy of the calling with which you were called, with all humility and meekness, with patience, bearing with one another in love,...” Eph. 4:1-2 In today’s Gospel (Mt. 22: 34-46) Jesus is tested by Pharisees about “which is the great commandment in the Law” (Mt. 22:36). He eludes their trap and repeats the Old Testament teaching on the need to love God and one’s neighbour: “’Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with thy whole heart, and with thy whole soul, and with thy whole mind.’ (Deut. 6:5) This is the greatest and the first commandment. And the second is like it, ‘Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.’ (Lev. 19:18) On these two commandments depend the whole Law and the Prophets.” Mt. 22: 37-40 The “love” of which Jesus speaks is what St. Paul describes as the practice of “humility, meekness and patience.”

The Glorious Bond of Charity
Dom Gueranger tells us “what we must do to prove ourselves worthy of the high honour offered to us by the Son of God. We must practise, among other virtues, these three—humility, mildness, and patience. These are the means for gaining the end that is so generously proposed to us. And what is that end? It is the unity of that immense body, which the Son of God makes His, by the mystic nuptials He vouchsafes to celebrate with our human nature. This Man-God asks one condition from those whom He calls, whom He invites, to become, through the Church, His bride, bone of His bones and flesh of His flesh (cf. Eph. 5:30). This one condition is, that they maintain such harmony among them that it will make one body and one spirit of them all, the bond of peace. ‘Bond most glorious!’ cries out St. John Chrysostom---‘bond most admirable, which unites us all with one another, and then, thus united, unites us with God.’ (Ep. Ad Eph., Hom. IX, 8) The strength of this bond is the strength of the holy Spirit Himself, who is all holiness and love; for it is that holy Spirit who forms these spiritual and divine ties; He it is who, with the countless multitudes of the baptized, does the work which the soul does in the human body—that is, gives it life, and unites all the members into oneness of person. It is by the Holy Ghost that young and old, poor and rich, men and women, distinct as all these are in other respects, are made one, fused, so to say, in the fire which eternally burns in the Blessed Trinity. But in order that the flame of infinite love may thus draw into its embrace our regenerated humanity, we must get rid of selfish rivalries, and grudges, and dissensions, which, so long as they exist among us, prove us to be carnal (cf. I Cor. 3:3), and, therefore, to be unfit material either for the divine flame to touch, or for the union which that flame produces.” Gueranger, p. 374-5

The Great Commandment
In today’s Gospel (Mt. 22:34-46), we see how the Pharisees fail in their attempt to trick Jesus into denying the greatest commandment of the law. “....they (the Pharisees) wanted to see if Jesus, who had declared Himself to be God, would not, consequently, make some addition to the commandment of divine love; and if He did they would be justified in condemning Him as having tried to change the letter of the law in its greatest commandment (St. Chrysostom, Hom. 77 in Matt.). Our Lord disappointed them. He met their question by giving it a longer answer than they had asked for. Having first recited the text of the great commandment as given in the Scriptures, he continued the quotation, and, by so doing, showed them that He was not ignorant of the intention which had induced them to question Him. He reminded them of the second commandment, like unto the first, the commandment of love of our neighbour, which condemned their intended crime of deicide (crucifixion of Jesus). Thus were they convicted of loving neither their neighbour, nor God Himself, for the first commandment cannot be observed if the second, which flows from and completes it, be broken.” Gueranger, p. 380-1

Denial of Jesus’ Divinity
Jesus not only shows how the Pharisees lack love of God and neighbour, but they also lack faith as they refuse to believe that Jesus is the Son of God. Dom Gueranger shows how Jesus proves that they are blinded in their hatred of Him: “He (Jesus) put a question, in His turn, to them, and they answer it by saying, as they were obliged to do, that the Christ was to be of the family of David; but if he be his Son, how comes it that David calls Him his Lord, just as he calls God Himself, as we have it in Psalm 109 (Ps. 109:1: ‘The Lord said to my Lord: Sit thou at my right hand, till I make thy enemies thy footstool.’), where he celebrates the glories of the Messiah? The only possible explanation is, that the Messiah, who in due time, and as Man, was to be born of David’s house, was God, and Son of God, even before time existed, according to the same psalm: ‘From my womb, before the day-star, I begot thee.’ Ps. 109:3 This answer would have condemned the Pharisees, so they refused to give it; but their silence was an avowal; and, before very long, the eternal Father’s vengeance (The Fall of Jerusalem in 70 AD) upon these vile enemies of His Son will fulfil the prophecy of making them His footstool in blood and shame: that time is to be the terrible day when the justice of God will fall upon the deicide city.” Gueranger, p. 381-2

Love of God Fulfils the Law
Unlike the Jews who rejected Christ and the law, the Christians, by loving Jesus, fulfil the whole law. Dom Gueranger contrasts the love of the Christians with the rejection of the Pharisees: “The Jews by rejecting Christ Jesus, sinned against both of the commandments which constitute charity, and embody the whole law; and we, on the contrary, by loving that same Jesus, fulfil the whole law. Jesus is the brightness of eternal glory (cf. Heb. 1:3) one, by nature, with the Father and the Holy Ghost; He is the God whom the first commandment bids us love, and it is in Him also that the second has its truest and adequate application....Nothing counts with God, excepting so far as it has reference to Jesus. As St. Augustine says (in Joan. Trace cx). God loves men only inasmuch as they either are, or may one day become members of His Son; it is His Son that He loves in them; thus He loves, with one same love though not equally, His Word, and the Flesh of His Word, and the members of His Incarnate Word. Now, charity is love—love such as it is in God, communicated to us creatures by the Holy Ghost. Therefore, what we should love, by charity, both in ourselves, and in others, is the divine Word, either as being, or, according to another expression of the same St. Augustine, ‘that He may be’ in others and in ourselves.’(Serm. cclv., in dieb pasch.) ....The question is St. Augustine’s again (Epist. lxi). ‘Who can love Christ without loving, with Him, the Church, which is His body? Without loving all His members? What we do—be it to the least, or be it to the worthiest, be it of evil, or of good—it is to Him we do it, for He tells us so (cf. Mt. 25: 40-45). Then let us love our neighbour as ourselves, because of Christ, who is in each of us, and who gives to us all union and increase of charity.’” (cf. Eph. 4:15, 16) Gueranger, p.382-3

“The Little Number of Those Who Are Saved” II
by St. Leonard of Port Maurice
Introduction
Thanks be to God, the number of the Redeemer's disciples is not so small that the wickedness of the Scribes and Pharisees is able to triumph over them. Although they strove to calumniate innocence and to deceive the crowd with their treacherous sophistries by discrediting the doctrine and character of Our Lord, finding spots even in the sun, many still recognized Him as the true Messiah, and, unafraid of either chastisements or threats, openly joined His cause. Did all those who followed Christ follow Him even unto glory? Oh, this is where I revere the profound mystery and silently adore the abysses of the divine decrees, rather than rashly deciding on such a great point! The subject I will be treating today is a very grave one; it has caused even the pillars of the Church to tremble, filled the greatest Saints with terror and populated the deserts with anchorites. The point of this instruction is to decide whether the number of Christians who are saved is greater or less than the number of Christians who are damned; it will, I hope, produce in you a salutary fear of the judgments of God.
Brothers, because of the love I have for you, I wish I were able to reassure you with the prospect of eternal happiness by saying to each of you: You are certain to go to paradise; the greater number of Christians is saved, so you also will be saved. But how can I give you this sweet assurance if you revolt against God's decrees as though you were your own worst enemies? I observe in God a sincere desire to save you, but I find in you a decided inclination to be damned. So what will I be doing today if I speak clearly? I will be displeasing to you. But if I do not speak, I will be displeasing to God.
Therefore, I will divide this subject into two points. In the first one, to fill you with dread, I will let the theologians and Fathers of the Church decide on the matter and declare that the greater number of Christian adults are damned; and, in silent adoration of that terrible mystery, I will keep my own sentiments to myself. In the second point I will attempt to defend the goodness of God versus the godless, by proving to you that those who are damned are damned by their own malice, because they wanted to be damned. So then, here are two very important truths. If the first truth frightens you, do not hold it against me, as though I wanted to make the road of heaven narrower for you, for I want to be neutral in this matter; rather, hold it against the theologians and Fathers of the Church who will engrave this truth in your heart by the force of reason. If you are disillusioned by the second truth, give thanks to God over it, for He wants only one thing: that you give your hearts totally to Him. Finally, if you oblige me to tell you clearly what I think, I will do so for your consolation. (to be continued next week)

The First Friday, 3 October 201
Now is a good time to continue (or begin) the devotion to the “Nine First Fridays” of the Month. The Sacred Heart of Jesus promised to St. Margaret Mary: "I promise thee in the excessive mercy of My Heart that My all-powerful love will grant to all those who communicate on the First Friday in nine consecutive months, the grace of final penitence; they shall not die in My disgrace nor without receiving the Sacraments; My Divine heart shall be their safe refuge in this last moment." There is no better way of honouring the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus than in receiving Holy Communion on the “Nine First Fridays.”.

The First Saturday, 4 August 2014
Our Lady told Sr. Lucia in 1925 “…I promise to assist at the hour of death, with all the graces necessary for salvation, all those who, on the first Saturday of five consecutive months go to confession and receive Holy Communion, recite five decades of the Rosary and keep me company for a quarter of an hour while meditating on the mysteries of the Rosary, with the intention of making reparation to me." If only we would do what Our Lady asks, we would be assured of eternal salvation. Our Lady promises us all the graces necessary for our salvation if we keep The Five First Saturdays! Just think that when you are about to die the Blessed Virgin Mary will be there with you to help you get to heaven! “Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen” How many times have you said these words in your lifetime?

Mission of the Immaculate Mediatrix 4 September 2014

On the First Saturday of every month, we will have our monthly formation program for those who are interested in affiliating themselves with the Marian Spirituality of the Franciscan Friars of the Immaculate. The day begins at 9:30 AM and goes until 4 PM and includes two conferences, Holy Mass, adoration and the rosary. (see flyer on door)
This spirituality is Marian and Franciscan and includes the teachings of St. Francis of Assisi, St. Maximilian Kolbe and other Franciscan saints. “The fundamental aim of the MIM is the fulfilment of God’s plan for the salvation and sanctification of all souls through the maternal mediation of the Immaculate to the supreme glory of the Most Holy Trinity.” (Article 2: Statute)
We hope that all of you will consider joining the MIM and work for your own sanctification and the sanctification of so many souls. Our Lady said at Fatima in 1917: “Many souls will go to hell because no one will pray and sacrifice for them.”

St. Teresa of Avila
The Fifth Centenary Celebrations1515-2015
Exhibition of the Life & Works of St.Teresa Cathedral of SS Mary & Boniface, Plymouth
Saturday, 4th October until Wednesday, 15th October
9:00 AM to 4 PM





Sixteenth Sunday after Pentecost 28th September 2014

Sixteenth Sunday after Pentecost
28 September 2014

“For everyone who exalts himself shall be humbled, and he who humbles himself shall be exalted.” Lk. 14:11
In today’s liturgy, we are given passages which celebrate the incredible riches of the coming of Jesus Christ, the Son of God. In the Epistle (Ephesians 3:13-21), St. Paul, although he is in chains in Rome, celebrates “the unfathomable riches of Christ.” Eph. 3:8 Today’s Gospel ( Luke 14:1-11), describes the miraculous ability of Jesus to cure the man with dropsy and shows how Our Lord’s divine wisdom counteracts the pride of the Pharisees in the “Parable of Choosing the Lowest Place at Table.” Only divine wisdom could have challenged the Pharisees in their custom of choosing the first place for themselves at banquets. By telling them to humble themselves and pick the lowest place at table, Jesus rebukes them for their prideful attack on Him for curing the man of dropsy on the Sabbath. He also reveals their own covetousness for honours and esteem before men. In teaching them the need to be humble, Jesus reveals the importance of humility in order to enter the heavenly kingdom He has prepared for them. Earlier, in the first chapter of the Epistle to the Ephesians, St. Paul had extolled this wonderful plan of God for all mankind: “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us with every spiritual blessing on high in Christ. Even as he chose us in him before the foundation of the world that we should be holy and without blemish in his sight in love.” Eph. 1: 3-4 In today’s Epistle, St. Paul praises the blessed calling of all Christians: “...and to have Christ dwelling through faith in your hearts: so that being rooted and grounded in love, you may be able to comprehend with all the saints what is the breadth and length and height and depth, and to know Christ’s love which surpasses knowledge, in order that you may be filled unto all fullness of God.” Eph. 3: 17-19

The Mystery of Christ Dwelling in Man
Dom Prosper Gueranger in his book, The Liturgical Life Vol. 11 comments on the plenitude of God which is given to the soul who believes in Jesus Christ. “For, God alone, as he tells us in the music we have just heard, can strengthen in us the inward man enough to make us understand, as the saints do, the dimensions (‘breadth, length, height and depth’) of the great mystery of Christ ‘dwelling’ in man, and ‘dwelling’ in him for the purpose of ‘filling him with the plenitude of God.’ Therefore is it, that falling on his knees before him from whom flows every perfect gift, and who has begotten us in truth by his love (cf. Jas. 1:17-8), our apostle (Paul) asks God to open, by faith and charity, the eyes of our heart, that we may be able to understand the splendid riches of the inheritance He reserves to His children, and the exceeding greatness of the divine power used in our favour, even in this life.” Gueranger, p. 359 The Holy Spirit opens to us the riches of God’s grace for those who will penetrate the mystery of the predestination to holiness in love for all those who will be “the praise of the glory of his grace.” (Eph. 1:6) Dom Gueranger comments on this high calling of the followers of Christ: “It is there that divine Wisdom reveals to the perfect that great secret of love, which is not known by the wise and the princes of this world—secret which the eye had not before seen, nor the ear heard, nor the heart even suspected as possible (cf. I Cor. 2: 6-9) ...The world was not as yet existing (“before the foundation of the world” Eph. 1: 4), and already God saw us in His Word (Christ) (cf. Eph. 1:4); to each one among us, He assigned the place he was to hold in the body of His Christ (cf. I Cor. 12:12-31; Eph. 4:12-16)), already, His fatherly eye beheld us clad with that grace (cf. Eph. 1:6) which made Him well-pleased with the Man-God; and He predestinated us (cf. Eph. 1:4-5), as being members of this His beloved Son, to sit with Him, on His right hand, in the highest heavens.. It is from the voluntary and culpable death of sin (cf. Eph. 2:1-5) that he calls us to that life which is His own life... Let us then be holy for the sake of giving praise to the glory of such grace (cf. Eph. 1: 4, 6) ...Thus, too, is to be wrought that mystery which, from all eternity, was the object of God’s eternal designs: the mystery, that is, of divine union, realized by our Lord Jesus uniting, in His own Person, in infinite love, both earth and heaven.” Gueranger, p. 361-2 Oh, how exalted is the calling of men to be Sons of God and “the praise of His glory” in heaven for all eternity.

The Heavenly Marriage Banquet
In a metaphorical way, the essential message of today’s Gospel is the practical fulfilment of what St. Paul is speaking about in today’s Epistle the predestination of the elect to the heavenly marriage banquet. Dom Gueranger comments on this calling: “The wedding spoken of in today’s Gospel is that of heaven, of which there is a prelude given here below, by the union effected in the sacred banquet of Holy Communion. The divine invitation is made to all; and the invitation is not like that which is given on the occasion of earthly weddings, to which the bridegroom and bride invite their friends and relatives as simple witnesses to the union contracted between two individuals. In the Gospel wedding, Christ is the Bridegroom, and the Church is the bride (cf. Apoc. 19:7).... But, for the attainment of all this—that is, that our Lord Jesus Christ may have that full control over the soul and its powers which makes her to be truly His, and subjects her to Him as the bride to her Spouse (cf. I Cor. 11:8-10) – it is necessary that all alien competition be entirely and definitively put aside.” Gueranger, p. 365.

Loss of Spiritual Ardour
In today’s Gospel, we see how Jesus stresses the importance of seeking God alone and not the honours of men in order to attain divine union. In a dramatic manner, as the Pharisees watch Him to see if He will break the Sabbath by curing the man with dropsy, Jesus not only cures the man with dropsy, but He reveals the serious sickness in the souls of the Pharisees. According to Dom Gueranger, quoting St. Ambrose, the man with dropsy represents “a morbid exuberance of humours, which stupefy the soul, and induce total extinction of spiritual ardour.” Gueranger, p. 367-6 Ven. Bede also shows that this loss of spiritual ardour is caused by lustful desires: “The dropsical man represents one who is weighed down by an overflowing stream of carnal pleasures, for it is a sickness named after the watery humour. But specifically the dropsical man is the covetous rich man who, the more he abounds in riches, the more ardently desires them, says St. Augustine.” The Commentary of Cornelius a Lapide, p. 540 Jesus cures the dropsical man of his covetousness for this world’s goods so that he can seek the riches of God. In reading the minds of the Pharisees, He also shows how His cure is just exactly what everyone else would do: “Which of you shall have an ass or a an
ox fall into a pit, and will not immediately draw him up on the Sabbath.” Lk. 14: 5. The pride of the Pharisees has blinded them so that they condemn Jesus for delivering a man from sickness, even though they themselves would do the same for one of their own animals

“...he who humbles himself shall be exalted.”
Lk. 14:11
Dom Gueranger commenting on the evil attitude of the Pharisees tells us of the importance of humility if we are going to be accepted in the heavenly feast as Christ’s bride: “But, as above all, it is to the constant attitude of humility that he must especially direct his attention who would secure a prominent place in the divine feast of the nuptials.” Gueranger, p. 366 Jesus had spoken the “Parable of the First Seats at Table” to show that the Pharisees are ambitious and proud to presume to take the first places at a wedding banquet.“Now Christ demonstrates how unbecoming it is to vie for the first seat at table, and thereby he silently demonstrates, by way of analogy, how unbecoming ambition is in any matter whatsoever. For sin continues to be sin, although the matter may differ from one case to the next.” A Lapide, p. 341-2. Although Jesus is commenting on the ambition of seeking the first place, He is primarily teaching us all that the only way to the heavenly banquet table is one of humility. “For everyone who exalts himself shall be humbled, and he who humbles himself shall be exalted.” Lk. 14:11 Those who wrongfully desire the praise of men will not be worthy to enter the heavenly banquet as brides of Christ.

The First Friday, 3 October 201
Now is a good time to continue (or begin) the devotion to the “Nine First Fridays” of the Month. The Sacred Heart of Jesus promised to St. Margaret Mary: "I promise thee in the excessive mercy of My Heart that My all-powerful love will grant to all those who communicate on the First Friday in nine consecutive months, the grace of final penitence; they shall not die in My disgrace nor without receiving the Sacraments; My Divine heart shall be their safe refuge in this last moment." There is no better way of honouring the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus than in receiving Holy Communion on the “Nine First Fridays.”.

The First Saturday, 4 August 2014
Our Lady told Sr. Lucia in 1925 “…I promise to assist at the hour of death, with all the graces necessary for salvation, all those who, on the first Saturday of five consecutive months go to confession and receive Holy Communion, recite five decades of the Rosary and keep me company for a quarter of an hour while meditating on the mysteries of the Rosary, with the intention of making reparation to me." If only we would do what Our Lady asks, we would be assured of eternal salvation. Our Lady promises us all the graces necessary for our salvation if we keep The Five First Saturdays! Just think that when you are about to die the Blessed Virgin Mary will be there with you to help you get to heaven! “Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen” How many times have you said these words in your lifetime?

Mission of the Immaculate Mediatrix 4 September 2014

On the First Saturday of every month, we will have our monthly formation program for those who are interested in affiliating themselves with the Marian Spirituality of the Franciscan Friars of the Immaculate. The day begins at 9:30 AM and goes until 4 PM and includes two conferences, Holy Mass, adoration and the rosary. (see flyer on door)
This spirituality is Marian and Franciscan and includes the teachings of St. Francis of Assisi, St. Maximilian Kolbe and other Franciscan saints. “The fundamental aim of the MIM is the fulfilment of God’s plan for the salvation and sanctification of all souls through the maternal mediation of the Immaculate to the supreme glory of the Most Holy Trinity.” (Article 2: Statute)
We hope that all of you will consider joining the MIM and work for your own sanctification and the sanctification of so many souls. Our Lady said at Fatima in 1917: “Many souls will go to hell because no one will pray and sacrifice for them.”


“The Little Number of Those Who Are Saved”
by St. Leonard of Port Maurice
Saint Leonard of Port Maurice was a most holy Franciscan friar who lived at the monastery of Saint Bonaventure in Rome. He was one of the greatest missioners in the history of the Church. He used to preach to thousands in the open square of every city and town where the churches could not hold his listeners. So brilliant and holy was his eloquence that once when he gave a two weeks' mission in Rome, the Pope and College of Cardinals came to hear him. The Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin, the adoration of the Blessed Sacrament and the veneration of the Sacred Heart of Jesus were his crusades. He was in no small way responsible for the definition of the Immaculate Conception made a little more than a hundred years after his death. He also gave us the Divine Praises, which are said at the end of Benediction. But Saint Leonard's most famous work was his devotion to the Stations of the Cross. He died a most holy death in his seventy-fifth year, after twenty-four years of uninterrupted preaching.
One of Saint Leonard of Port Maurice's most famous sermons was "The Little Number of Those Who Are Saved." It was the one he relied on for the conversion of great sinners. This sermon, like his other writings, was submitted to canonical examination during the process of canonization. In it he reviews the various states of life of Christians and concludes with the little number of those who are saved, in relation to the totality of men.
The reader who meditates on this remarkable text will grasp the soundness of its argumentation, which has earned it the approbation of the Church. Here is the great missionary's vibrant and moving sermon. (to be continued next and subsequent weeks)

St. Teresa of Avila
Fifth the Centenary Celebrations
1515-2015
Exhibition of the Life & Works of St. Teresa
Cathedral of SS Mary & Boniface
Plymouth
Saturday, 4th October until Wednesday, 15th October
9:00 AM to 4 PM

Fifteenth Sunday after Pentecost 21st September 2014

Fifteenth Sunday after Pentecost
21 September 2014

“But fear seized upon all, and they began to glorify God, saying, ‘A great prophet has arisen among us,’ and ‘God has visited his people.’”
Lk. 7:16

Today’s liturgy is dominated by the Gospel in which Jesus Christ, who is “the resurrection and the life” Jn. 11:25 raises the widow’s son from the dead. This is the same Jesus who appears on our altars, gives us life and raises us from the dead. “It is important to stress this connection between the Gospel and the altar, because it is all very well to think of the Gospel as history in which we are taught divine truths which unite us to God. But there is more to it than that; we must love the Gospel by means of its mystical significance. When the Church chooses a passage of the Gospel to include in the Mass, she does so with the idea that, not only will it reveal certain facts to us about our religion, but also so that, through the whole sacrifice, sacraments, and prayers of the liturgy, we shall draw abundant fruit for our souls. We shall begin to live what we have heard.” The Preacher’s Encyclopedia, Twelfth to Last Sundays after Pentecost, p. 152 In today’s Epistle (Gal. 5:25-26; 6: 1-10) St. Paul again emphasizes, as we saw in the Fourteenth Sunday after Pentecost, the conflict between the flesh and the spirit: “For what a man sows, he will reap. For he who sows in the flesh also will reap corruption. But he who sows in the spirit will reap life everlasting.” Gal. 5: 8 The one hope that we all have is seen in today’s Gospel (Lk. 7:11-16) where Jesus raises “the only son of his mother” Lk. 7:12 in the town of Naim (means beautiful, delightful, pleasing). Here we see the theme that runs through today’s liturgy: “Whatever good there is in us is the fruit of His grace...Without Jesus we would abide in death; without Him we could never live the glorious life of the Spirit described by St. Paul in today’s Epistle.” Fr. Gabriel of St. Magdalen, OCD, Divine Intimacy, p. 880

“...he who sows in the spirit will reap life everlasting.” Ga. 5: 8
Dom Prosper Gueranger in his The Liturgical Life, Vol. 13 comments on the spiritual life produced in our souls by the Holy Spirit: “When the flesh has been subdued, we must beware of supposing that the structure of our perfection is completed. Not only must the combat be kept up after the victory, under penalty of losing all we have won, but we must also be on the watch, lest one or other of the heads of the triple concupiscence (the world, the flesh and the devil) take advantage of the soul’s efforts being elsewhere directed to raise itself against us, and sting us all the more terribly, because it is left to do just as it pleases. The apostle warns us here of vain-glory, and well he may; for vain-glory is, more than other enemies always in a menacing attitude ready to in infuse its subtle poison even into acts of humility and penance...Would to God we could ever have ringing in our ears the saying of the apostle: “Whilst we have time, let us work good to all men” Gal. 6:10 ...Then will man reap with joy what he shall have sown in tears (cf Ps. 125:5); he failed not, he grew not weary of doing good while in the dreary land of his exile; still less will he ever tire of the everlasting harvest which is to be in the living light of the eternal day.” Gueranger, p. 346, 348 & 349) “... he who sows in the spirit will reap life everlasting.” Ga. 5: 8

Jesus is our only Life
“The thought that Jesus is our Life shines forth even more in the Gospel. The Master meets the sad funeral procession of a young man. His mother is walking beside the bier, weeping. ‘And the Lord, seeing her, had compassion on her, and said to her: ‘Weep not.’ And he came near and touched the bier... And He said: ‘Young man, I say to thee, arise...’ And He gave him to his mother.” (Lk. 7:13-4) Fr. Gabriel, p. 881 Jesus not only restores the son to life, but, in The Commentary on the Gospel of Luke According to Cornelius a Lapide, He also restores the souls of all sinners to the life of grace: “Allegorically, the widow is the Church, who mourns her dead sons—that is Christians who through mortal sin have been deprived of God’s grace, which is life, as it were, the soul of the soul—and by her tears begs forgiveness for them and the life of grace. Therefore, Christ 1. Halts the funeral procession, i.e., checks and restrains those passions which gain mastery over the young, so that the sinner may no longer follow them. 2. Touches the bier, i.e., the wood of the cross, sinners are moved by God to repentance and filled with grace. Hence, 3. The dead man sits up and begins to speak, i.e., begins to do good and to praise God, so that astonishment seizes all those who witness such a great and godly chance and they glorify God with one voice. So St. Ambrose, Euthymius, Theophylact, and Bede (in loco), as St. Augustine (serm. 44 de Verbis Domini). We have a living example of this in St. Monica, who as a widow mourned unceasingly for her son, Augustine, who was dead in heresy and wantonness, and she recalled him by her prayers and tears to such holiness of life that he became an eminent doctor of the Church, as he himself relates in his Confessions. Again, more particularly, the widow is the Church, the son—the people of the gentiles barred by the plank of concupiscence—and as the wood which brought death and to which it has grown accustomed—and as it were enclosed in bier, i.e., by the wood of the cross, Christ restored to life.” a Lapide, p. 377.
The miracle of the soul’s conversion
In another spiritual interpretation of this miracle (tropologically), from a moral point of view, Cornelius a Lapide sees how pastors of the Church should act towards sinners: “Tropologically, in the example of this widow we see how a pastor or a rector or a confessor should act when any of his weak spiritual children should happen to fall into mortal sin and are being borne to the grave of everlasting despair. He should follow the funeral procession with his fellow citizens, i.e., with weeping, wailing, and much lamentation, for thus his soul will receive comfort from the Lord who: 1. Touching the bier will cause the pallbearers to stand still, i.e., will put an end to lusts; 2. Will recall the dead to life; and 3. Will raise him up to the practice of the virtues, so that he may speak and confess his sins and proclaim the loving kindness of God. Thus at last he is restored to the Church, his mother, whose past sorrow will be eclipsed by her present joy, and thus also many will marvel and be led to extol the goodness of God.” A Lapide, p. 337-8.

Spiritual Meaning of Jesus’ Miracles of raising the dead to life
Cornelius a Lapide sees in the three people whom Jesus raised from the dead a spiritual (moral or tropological) significance. “We read that Christ raised three people to life. 1. The daughter of the ruler of the synagogue in the house, i.e. one who sins in the thoughts and intention. 2. The son of the widow at the gate, i.e. one who manifests his sinful intention in words, and misleads others. 3. Lazarus in the tomb, i.e. the consummate sinner who by repeating an action has contracted the habit of sin, so that he lies as it were buried in sin without hope of salvation or resurrection. The first, Christ raised to life by secret prayer apart from others; the second by a command; the third by crying with a loud voice, ‘Lazarus, come forth.’ Jn. 11:43 This is because a sin in thought only is easily cured; more difficult is a sin in speech; and the most difficult is the sin that is actually and repeatedly committed, in which a person lies as though asleep, indeed as though dead and buried. Hence it is necessary for Christ to cry aloud in a mighty voice to the sinner’s heart, so that he may come to his senses.” a Lapide, p. 378 In Jesus’ three miracles of raising the dead, there is also a spiritual meaning of the increased seriousness of sins of the thought, word and deed.

“If anyone eat of this bread, he will live forever;...” Jn. 6:51
How blessed we are when we come to Holy Mass and receive the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ in the Holy Eucharist. Jesus comes to give us life everlasting. He promised us this when He said: “I am the living bread that has come down heaven. If anyone eat of this bread, he will live forever; and the bread that I will give is my flesh for the life of world.” Jn. 6: 51-2 This is one of Jesus’ most important promises; He promises us life everlasting when we come to receive His Body and Blood in the Holy Eucharist at Mass. Even if we are spiritually dead through mortal sin, He will raise us up, like He did with the only son of widow of Naim, by forgiving our sins in the sacrament of Penance through the priests of His Church. How blessed are those who live in the Spirit of Jesus Christ for they will have life everlasting.

How to attend Holy Mass
“The Holy Mass is a prayer itself, even the highest prayer that exists. It is the sacrifice, dedicated by our Redeemer at the Cross, and repeated every day on the altar. If you wish to hear Mass, as it should be heard, you must follow with eye, heart, and mouth all that happens at the altar. Further, you must pray with the Priest the holy words said by him in the Name of Christ and which Christ says by him. You have to associate your heart with the holy feelings which are contained in these words, and in this manner you ought to follow all that happens at the altar. When acting in this way, you have prayed Holy Mass.”

Sunday, September 14, 2014

Feast of the Exaltation of the Cross, Sunday 14 September 2014

Feast of the Exaltation of the Cross, Sunday 14 September 2014


“And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the desert even so must the Son of Man be lifted up that those who believe in Him may have life everlasting.” Jn. 3:14

Today’s feastday, The Exaltation of the Holy Cross, has a dual significance: first, there is the votive commemoration of the historical finding of the True Cross by St. Helen in 320 AD, and the return of the Cross to Mt Calvary by Heraclius, Emperor of the East, who after defeating King Chosroes (who had taken the Cross from Jerusalem) had carried the Cross himself to the Basilica on Mt. Calvary in 629 A D; second, there is the mystery of our redemption which is symbolized by Jesus Christ’s death on the Cross. It is this latter significance which is the most important one for us today.

The Cross Proves Our Love

The Cross of Jesus was the supreme proof of the love which Jesus Christ, the Son of God, had for His creatures. In like manner our carrying of our crosses should be the finest proof of our love for God. St. John of the Cross says that the reason why so few reach the heights of perfection is that they are not willing to carry their cross. Therefore, God allows them to remain in the state of mediocrity. We should will to do more to show our love and gratitude for Jesus, who died on the cross for us, by carrying our crosses with generosity. “God loveth the cheerful giver.” II Cor. 9:7

The Glory of the Cross

Before Christ died on the Cross, the cross was an ignominious and despised object of punishment for the Jews. It was invented by the Romans to persecute its enemies. After Christ’s death on the Cross, it was a sign of His suffering and love for us. St. Paul would tell of its glory: “For the Jews ask for signs and Greeks look for wisdom; but we for our part preach a crucified Christ—to the Jews indeed a stumbling block and to the Greeks foolishness, but to those who are called both Jews and Greeks, the power of God and the wisdom of God. For the foolishness of God is wiser than men, and the weakness of God is stronger than men.” I Cor. 1:22-5 The Cross of Jesus Christ is the glory of our redemption. It is the trophy of the Jesus’ victory over death and sin. It is the sign of our salvation. It is Christ’s glory! For this He came into the world: “Sacrifice and oblation, thou wouldst not, then said I behold I come.” Heb. 10:5 Bishop Sheen said: “Jesus Christ was the only one born to die.” Jesus told us of His glory the night before he died: “Now is the Son of Man glorified, and God is glorified in him. If God is glorified in him God will also glorify him in himself and will glorify him at once.” Jn. 13:31-2 The glory of the Cross is that Jesus conquers death and sin with His sacrifice on the Cross out of obedience to His Father and His infinite love for man.

The Cross is the Tree of Life

By Jesus’ death on the Cross all men will be drawn to him as He said: “And I if be lifted up from the earth, I will draw all things to myself.” Jn.12:32 This lifting up of all men to Christ will bring life to all souls. When the Israelites were punished by God with the bite of serpents, God prescribed to Moses to have the Jews mount a brazen serpent on a pole and their health would be restored. So too the brazen serpent is a figure of Christ who will restore spiritual health to all those who come to Him on the tree of the Cross. From the tree of the Cross there comes life unlike the tree of good and evil in the Garden of Eden which brought death to Adam and Eve for transgressing God’s command.

“unto death, even to the death of the Cross.” (Phil. 2:8)


Fr. Gabriel, OCD tells us in his book of meditations, Divine Intimacy, comments that we need to imitate Jesus so that we will become like Him even unto death: “… we must follow Him in His Passion, prepared to share in it by stirring up in ourselves, according to St. Paul’s exhortation (Today’s Epistle: Phil. 2:5-11), His sentiments of humility and total immolation which will bring us like Him and with Him “unto death, even to the death of the Cross.” (Phil. 2:8) Fr. Gabriel, p. 392 Because of Jesus’ “...obedience unto death of the Cross. Therefore God also has exalted him and has bestowed upon him the name that is above every name, so that at the name of Jesus every knee should bend of those in heaven, on earth and under the earth.” Phil. 2:8-10

“And I, if I be lifted up from the earth, will draw all things to myself.” John 12:32

In today’s Gospel, John 12:31-36, Cornelius a Lapide in his Commentary on the Gospel of St. John tells us: “ If I be lifted up, Latin, exaltatus, …. Most commentators say that it means, ‘If I be lifted up on the cross, i.e., if I be lifted on the cross, i. e. if I be crucified on high on a cross.’… Christ alludes to what He said in John 3:14-5: ‘As Moses lifted up the serpent in the desert so must the Son of man be lifted up; that whosoever believeth in him may not perish; but may have life everlasting.’ Morally, Christ teaches us here that the cross is not to be dreaded, but desired, because the cross alone exalts.
‘All things,’ that is soul and body, say St. Augustine and Bede. But Rupertus says that all things means heaven and earth, men, angels and devils, ‘for I will bring it about that every knee should bow, of those that are in heaven, on earth, and under the earth (Phil. 2:10).
“Thirdly, and more simply, all things means ‘all men of all nations who will believe in Me, that is all races of men, says St. Augustine. Hence S. Cyril, Chrysostom, and Theophylactus instead of all things have the reading ‘all men’, but all things is more emphatic as if to say: ‘All the spoils of the devil, that is, all the choicest things of the world which are the nations of the whole world that believe in Me.’
“I will draw. That is, ‘I will withdraw from the devil against his will, so that I may effectively draw and sweetly allure them to Myself, not against their own will, but willingly, and make them My brethren; nay more, My children, that as I am the Son of God by nature, so they may be the sons of God by adoption.”
“…Hear St. Leo (serm. 8 de Passione), treating this whole passage elegantly and tenderly. ‘O Wondrous power of the cross! O ineffable glory of the passion, wherein is seen the tribunal of the Lord, the judgment of the world and the power of the Crucified! For Thou didst draw, O Lord, all things unto Thee. And when Thou didst stretch forth Thine hands all the day to an unbelieving and obstinate people, the whole world felt the force of Thine acknowledged Majesty. Thou didst draw all things to Thyself; O Lord, when in execration of the sin of the Jews all the elements pronounced one and the same sentence, when the luminaries of the heaven were obscured, and day was turned into night, the earth also was shaken with strange quaking, and the whole creation refused its aid to the service of the wicked.’ He then develops this idea of Christ drawing all things even more forcefully: ‘Thou hast drawn all things to Thee, O Lord, for when the veil of the temple was rent, the holy of holies was withdrawn from the unworthy high priests, in order that the figure might be changed into Truth, prophecy into manifestation, and the law into the gospel. Thou, O Lord, didst draw all things to Thee, in order that that which was kept hid in one temple of Judea, by shadows and outward signs, the devotion of all nations might everywhere celebrate by a full and manifest sacrament. For now there is a more illustrious order of Levites, a higher dignity of elders, and a more sacred unction of priests. Because Thy cross is the fount of all blessings, the source of all graces, through which believers obtain strength out of weakness, glory out of shame, and life out of death.” A Lapide, p. 492-4

The Sign of the Cross

We should truly love the Cross! The Church teaches us this when we sign ourselves with the Cross. The sign of the cross symbolizes our two greatest mysteries, the Blessed Trinity and the Redemption. In the Name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Ghost, we bless ourselves with the sign of the Cross which is the symbol of our Redemption by the Incarnate Son of God. Jesus showed His great love for us by His sacrifice on the Cross: “Greater love than this no man hath than to lay down his life for his friends.” Jn. 15:13 The sign the Cross is very simple, but how much wisdom and truth it contains. No wonder the Devil fears the Cross and the sign of the Cross. It is the sign that puts him to flight! Use it often especially in times of temptation.

Suffering for Christ

As Jesus Christ suffered and died for us on the Cross, so we should be willing to suffer and die for him. This is how we prove our love! Jesus told us that if we want to be His disciples and enter heaven, then we need to carry our daily crosses: “If anyone will come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me.” Lk. 9:23 St. Pio said that if we could see the value of suffering (carrying our crosses), we would beg for more suffering. Let us not wake up when it is too late and be sorry that we did not carry our crosses better in imitation of our beloved Saviour Jesus Christ who suffered and died for us on the Cross.

How to attend Holy Mass

“The Holy Mass is a prayer itself, even the highest prayer that exists. It is the sacrifice, dedicated by our Redeemer at the Cross, and repeated every day on the altar. If you wish to hear Mass, as it should be heard, you must follow with eye, heart, and mouth all that happens at the altar. Further, you must pray with the Priest the holy words said by him in the Name of Christ and which Christ says by him. You have to associate your heart with the holy feelings which are contained in these words, and in this manner you ought to follow all that happens at the altar. When acting in this way, you have prayed Holy Mass.”







Thirteenth Sunday after Pentecost, 7 September 2014

Thirteenth Sunday after Pentecost
7 September 2014
“Were not the ten made clean? But where are the nine. Has no one been found to return and give glory to God except this foreigner.” Lk. 19:17

Today’s Liturgy reminds us of the wonderful plans that God has given to man with the coming of His Son Jesus Christ. In the Epistle (Gal. 3:16-22) St. Paul instructs the Galatians, who wanted Christians to observe the rituals of the Jews. He reminds them of the promise of Abraham and his seed, the Messiah Jesus Christ. This Promise to Abraham came before the Law (by 430 years) and was more important than the Law (the Ten Commandments) which was given to Moses on Mt. Sinai for the transgressions of the Jews (Cf. IICor.3:4-9). Here we see again, as we did last Sunday, the inadequacy of the Sinai Law given by God to Moses to overcome the sinful transgressions of Israel. Only in the New Testament through faith in Jesus Christ and baptism have the Christians been delivered from sin. We saw last Sunday how this blindness, on the part of the Jews, resulted in a lack of faith in the parable of the Good Samaritan where the Levite and the priest, both Jews, lacked the charity to care for the man who was attacked by robbers. In today’s Gospel (Luke 17:11-19), Jesus cures the ten lepers, one of whom is a Samaritan. Once again, it is the faithful Samaritan, the Gentile and outsider, who alone has enough charity to return to give thanks and glory to Jesus. “Were not the ten made clean? But where are the nine? Has no one been found to return and give glory to God except this foreigner?” Lk. 19: 17

Promise to Abraham
Dom Prosper Gueranger in his book, The Liturgical Year Vol. 13, comments on the hope that was given to Abraham when he learned of the promise of the coming Messiah: “Look up to heaven, and number the stars, if thou canst! So shall thy seed be! (Gen. 15:5) Abraham was almost a hundred years old, and Sara’s barrenness deprived him of all natural hope of posterity, when these words were spoken to him by God. Abraham, nevertheless, believed God, says the Scripture, and it was reputed to him unto justice (cf. Gen. 15:6) And when, later on, that same faith would have led him to sacrifice, on the mount that son of the promise, his only hope, God renewed His promise, and added: ‘In thy seed shall all the nations of the earth be blessed.’ Gen. 22:18 ...His faith, firm and, at the same time, so simple, gave to God the glory which He looks for from His creatures. ...Following in Abraham’s steps (cf. Rom. 4:12), there have come those multitudes, born for heaven, the children of his faith....Truly, then, the benediction of Abraham has been poured forth on the Gentiles (cf. Gal. 3:14). Christ Jesus, the true Son of the Promise, the only seed of salvation, has, by faith in His Resurrection (cf. Rom. 4:24), assembled from every nation (cf. Gal. 3:28) them that are of good will (cf. Lk. 2:14), making them all one in Him, making them, like Himself children of Abraham (cf. Gal. 3:29), and, what is better still children of God. (cf. Gal. 4:5-7). Gueranger, p. 311-3

Children of the Promise Not the Law
St. Paul tells us in today’s epistle to recognize that the Promise to Abraham was fulfilled in Jesus Christ: “The promises were made to Abraham and to his offspring. He does not say, ‘And to his offsprings,’ as of many; but as of one, ‘And to thy offspring,’ who is Christ.’” Gal. 3:16 Dom Gueranger comments on the effectiveness of the promised redeemer, Abraham’s offspring, compared to the Law of Sinai: “...St. Paul will declare the transient character of that legislation, which came four hundred and thirty years after a promise which could not be changed; neither was such legislation to continue, when the time should come for that Son of Abraham to appear, from whom the world was waiting to receive the promised benediction.” Gueranger p. 315 Similarly, Dom Gueranger quotes the Abbot Rupert on the spiritual meaning of the Parable of the Good Samaritan in relation to the law and promise: “Abbot Rupert, ‘bears on the history of that Samaritan, whose name signifies keeper; it is our Lord Jesus Christ who, by His Incarnation, comes to the rescue of man, whom the old Law was not able to keep from harm; and when Jesus leaves the world, He consigns the poor sufferer to the care of the apostles and the apostolic men, in the house of the Church ...Thus, the priest and the levite of the parable are a figure of the Law; and their passing by the half-dead man, seeing him, indeed, but without making an attempt to heal him, is expressive of what the Law did. True, it did not go counter to God’s promises; but, of itself, it could justify no man.’...” Gueranger, p. 315

Leprosy of Sin
The cure of the ten lepers by Jesus represents in a spiritual sense the delivery of men from the evils of sin. Only Jesus, the Promised one of Abraham, could accomplish this because He is the Son of God who alone can forgive sin. Dom Gueranger comments on the symbolic meaning of the lepers in relation to the Promise and the Law: “The Samaritan leper, cured of that hideous malady which is an apt figure of sin, in the company with nine lepers of Jewish nationality, represents the despised race of Gentiles, who were at first admitted, by stealth, so to say, and by extraordinary privilege, into a share of the graces belonging to the lost sheep of the house of Israel (cf. Mt. 15:24). The conduct of these ten men, on occasion of their miraculous cure, is in keeping with the attitude assumed by the peoples they typify, regarding the salvation offered to the world by the Son of God. It is a fresh demonstration of what the apostle says: ‘All are not Israelites that are of Israel; neither are all they who are the seed of Abraham, children; ‘but,’ says the Scripture (cf. Gen. 21:12), ‘in Isaac shall thy seed be called’; that is to say, not they who are children of the flesh are children of God: but they that are the children of the promise are counted for the seed (cf. Rom. 9:6-8); they are born of the faith of Abraham, and are, in the eyes of the Lord, the true progeny....The lepers are made clean only while on their way to show themselves to the priests, ....That Law gave to the Sons of Aaron the power, not that of curing, but of discerning leprosy, and passing judgment on its being cured or not (cf. Lev. 13). ” Gueranger, p. 323

Divine Power of the New Law
Dom Gueranger shows how the Law of Sinai has kept the Jews from recognizing the truth. “The time, however, has now come for a Law far above that of Sinai. It has a priesthood, whose judgments are not to concern the state of the body, but, the pronouncing the sentence of absolution, are to effectually remove the leprosy of souls (sin). The cure which the ten lepers felt coming upon them before they had reached the priests, ought to have sufficed to show them, in Jesus, the power of the new priesthood, which had been foretold by the prophets (cf. Is. 66:21-23); the power which thus forestalls and surpasses the authority of the ancient ministration is sufficient evidence of the superior dignity of Him who exercises it... But the Jew is far from being ready to understand these great mysteries. And yet the Law had been given to him that it might serve him as a hand leading him to Christ, and without exposing him to err....Gratitude should have been uppermost in the heart of Juda; but pride took its place. He was so taken up with the honour that had been put on him that it made him lose all desire for the Messiah... He laid it down as a dogma that no divine intervention can ever equal that made on Sinai; that every future prophet, everyone sent by God, must be inferior to Moses; that all possible salvation is in the Law, and that from it alone flows every grace....nine have not even the remotest thought of coming to their Deliverer to thank Him; these nine are Jews. Jesus, to their minds, is a mere disciple of Moses, a bare instrument of favours, holding his commission from Sinai, and as soon as they have gone through the legal formality of their purification they take it that all their obligations to God are paid. The Samaritan, the despised Gentile, whose sufferings have given him that humility which makes the sinner clear-sighted, is the only one who recognizes God by His divine works, and gives Him thanks for His favours.” Gueranger, p. 322-4

First Friday, 5 September 2014
Now is a good time to continue (or begin) the devotion to the “Nine First Fridays” of the Month. The Sacred Heart of Jesus promised to St. Margaret Mary: "I promise thee in the excessive mercy of My Heart that My all-powerful love will grant to all those who communicate on the First Friday in nine consecutive months, the grace of final penitence; they shall not die in My disgrace nor without receiving the Sacraments; My Divine heart shall be their safe refuge in this last moment." There is no better way to honour the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus than doing the “Nine First Fridays” every month.

First Saturday, 6 September 2014
Our Lady told Sr. Lucia in 1925 “…I promise to assist at the hour of death, with all the graces necessary for salvation, all those who, on the first Saturday of five consecutive months go to confession and receive Holy Communion, recite five decades of the Rosary and keep me company for a quarter of an hour while meditating on the mysteries of the Rosary, with the intention of making reparation to me." If only we would do what Our Lady asks, we would be assured of eternal salvation. Our Lady promises us all the graces necessary for our salvation if we keep The Five First Saturdays! Just think that when you are about to die the Blessed Virgin Mary will be there with you to help you get to heaven! “Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen” How many times have you said these words in your lifetime?

Mission of the Immaculate Mediatrix
6 September 2014

On the First Saturday of every month, we will have our monthly formation program for those who are interested in affiliating themselves with the Marian Spirituality of the Franciscan Friars of the Immaculate. The day begins at 9:30 AM and goes until 4 PM and includes two conferences, Holy Mass, adoration and the rosary. (see flyer on door)
This spirituality is Marian and Franciscan and includes the teachings of St. Francis of Assisi, St. Maximilian Kolbe and other Franciscan saints. “The fundamental aim of the MIM is the fulfilment of God’s plan for the salvation and sanctification of all souls through the maternal mediation of the Immaculate to the supreme glory of the Most Holy Trinity.” (Article 2: Statute)
We hope that all of you will consider joining the MIM and work for your own sanctification and the sanctification of so many souls. Our Lady said at Fatima in 1917: “Many souls will go to hell because no one will pray and sacrifice for them.”

Why the Rosary is so important!

“Continue to pray the Rosary every day.”
Our Lady of Fatima to Sister Lucia

“Never will anyone who says his Rosary every day be led astray. This is a statement that I would gladly sign with my blood.”
Saint Louis de Montfort

“You shall obtain all you ask of me by the recitation of the Rosary.”
Our Lady to Blessed Alan de la Roche

“Give me an army saying the Rosary and I will conquer the world.” Pope Blessed Pius IX

“If you persevere in reciting the Rosary, this will be a most probable sign of your eternal salvation.” Blessed Alan de la Roche

“The greatest method of praying is to pray the Rosary.” Saint Francis de Sales


“When the Holy Rosary is said well, it gives Jesus and Mary more glory and is more meritorious than any other prayer.”
Saint Louis de Montfort

“The Holy Rosary is the storehouse of countless blessing.” Blessed Alan de la Roche

“One day, through the Rosary and the Scapular, Our Lady will save the world.” Saint Dominic

“If you say the Rosary faithfully unto death, I do assure you that, in spite of the gravity of your sins, ‘you will receive a never-fading crown of glory’ (1 St. Peter 5:4).” Saint Louis de Montfort


“You must know that when you ‘hail’ Mary, she immediately greets you! Don’t think that she is one of those rude women of whom there are so many—on the contrary, she is utterly courteous and pleasant. If you greet her, she will answer you right away and converse with you!”
Saint Bernardine of Siena


“Recite your Rosary with faith, with humility, with confidence, and with perseverance.”
Saint Louis de Montfort

“The rich in graces of all prayers; it is the prayer that touches most the Heart of the Mother of God…and if you wish peace to reign in your homes, recite the family Rosary.” Pope Saint Pius X

Rosary is the most beautiful and the most
“Never will anyone who says his Rosary every day become a formal heretic or be led astray by the devil.” Saint Louis de Montfort

“Even if you are on the brink of damnation, even if you have one foot in hell, even if you have sold your soul to the devil as sorcerers do who practice black magic, and even if you are a heretic as obstinate as a devil, sooner or later you will be converted and will amend your life and will save your soul, if—and mark well what I say—if you say the Holy Rosary devoutly every day until death for the purpose of knowing the truth and obtaining contrition and pardon for your sins.” Saint Louis de Montfort

“The Most Holy Virgin in these last times in which we live has given a new efficacy to the recitation of the Rosary to such an extent that there is no problem, no matter how difficult it is, whether temporal or above all spiritual, in the personal life of each one of us, of our families…that cannot be solved by the Rosary. There is no problem, I tell you, no matter how difficult it is, that we cannot resolve by the prayer of the Holy Rosary.”
Sister Lucia dos Santos, Fatima seer

“When you say your Rosary, the angels rejoice, the Blessed Trinity delights in it, my Son finds joy in it too, and I myself am happier than you can possibly guess. After the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, there is nothing in the Church that I love as much as the Rosary.”
Our Lady to Blessed Alan de la Roche

“‘Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee!’ No creature has ever said anything that was more pleasing to me, nor will anyone ever be able to find or say to me anything that pleases me more.” Our Lady to Saint Mechtilde







Thursday, August 28, 2014

Twelfth Sunday after Pentecost, 31 August 2014

Twelfth Sunday after Pentecost
31 August 2014

“Blessed are the eyes that see what you see! For I say to you, many prophets and kings have desired to see what you see, and they have not seen it; and to hear what you hear, and they have not heard it.” Lk. 10: 23-4

In today’s readings, we have a profound teaching on the coming of Jesus Christ and the subsequent effects of divine grace on the soul. St. Paul in the Second Epistle to the Corinthians (3:4-9) contrasts the glory of the Old Covenant of Moses and the Jews with the glory of the New Covenant which Jesus Christ, the Son of God, brought to fulfilment by His sharing of His divine life with each person who is baptized. The glory given to Moses pales in comparison to the eternal glory given to men by Christ: “For if there is glory in the ministration that condemned (Old Covenant), much more does the ministration that justifies abound in glory (New Covenant).” II Cor. 3:9 In the Gospel (Lk. 10:23-37) Jesus is asked a question by a lawyer, “Master what must I do to gain eternal life?” Lk. 10:25 Jesus replies by telling the lawyer and the other Jews present The Parable of the Good Samaritan, which is the quintessential gospel message of charity towards one’s neighbour. This message is so important that only those who practice this charity, which is given at Baptism with divine grace, will inherit the glory of heaven. Only they will have the eternal glory that Christ promises to all those who have faith in him and follow His teachings. This is why Jesus praises those who see him and believe in Him: “Blessed are the eyes that see what you see.” Lk. 10: 23

The Glory of the Old and New Testament
Dom Prosper Gueranger in his book, “The Liturgical Year,” Vol. II comments on the differences between the glory of the Old and New Testament: “But let us examine what is this ‘glory’ of the new Testament, which so fills the apostle (Paul) with ecstasy, and, in his mind, almost entirely eclipses the splendour of the old. Splendour there undoubtedly was in the Covenant of Sinai. Never had there been such a manifestation of God’s majesty, and omnipotence, and holiness, as on the that day, when, gathering together, at the foot of the mount, the descendents of the twelve sons of Jacob, He mercifully renewed, with this immense family, the covenant formerly made with their fathers, and gave them His Law in the extraordinary solemn manner described in the Book of Exodus. And yet, that Law, engraven as it was on stone by God’s own hand, was not, for all that, in the hearts of the receivers; neither did its holiness prevent, though it condemned, sin—sin which reigns in man’s heart. (cf. Rom. 7:12-3) Moses, who carried the divine writing, came down from the mount, having the rays of God’s ‘glory’ glittering on his face (cf. Ex. 34: 29-35); but this ‘glory’ was not to be shared in by the people of whom he was the head; it was for himself alone as was likewise the privilege he had enjoyed of speaking with God face to face; it ceased with him, thus signifying, by its short duration, the character of that ministration, which was to cease on the coming of the Messiah, just as the night’s borrowed light vanishes when the day appears. And, as it were, the better to show that the time was not as yet come, when God would manifest His glory—the children of Israel were not able to gaze on the face of Moses; so that, when he had to speak to the people, he had need to put on the veil. Though a mere borrowed light the brightness of Moses’ face represented the ‘glory’ of the future Covenant, whose splendour was to shine, not, of course, externally, but in the hearts of us all, by giving us ‘the light of the knowledge of the glory of God, in the face of Christ Jesus.’” II Cor. 4:6 Gueranger, p. 292-3

“Blessed are the eyes that see what you see!” Lk.10:23
How blessed were those who heard Jesus speak in today’s gospel about how the Good Samaritan truly loved his neighbour. Only those who have been enlightened by God’s grace can practice such charity. Dom Gueranger comments on the interior “glory” given to those who have faith in Jesus Christ: “Jesus, the Man-God, of whom Paul was but the servant, reveals to us, in the Gospel, the perfection of that Law, which He came to give to the world. And as though He would, in a certain way, unite His own divine teachings with those of His apostle, and justify that apostle’s enthusiasm, it is from the very depth of His own most holy soul, and in the Holy Ghost (cf. Lk. 10: 23-4) that having thanked His eternal Father for these great things, He cries out, turning to His disciples: “Blessed are the eyes that see what you see!” Lk.10:23 .... Faith, which guides the just man, is enough to make him estimate the life of the senses for what it really is,-- miserable and grovelling. With the aid of ordinary grace, he easily lives in that intimate retirement of the soul, wherein he knows that the holy Trinity resides; he knows it, because he has it from the teaching of Scriptures (Cf. Jn. 14:23). His heart is a kind of heaven, where his life is hidden in God, together with that Jesus upon whom are fixed all his thoughts (cf. Col. 3:3): there he gives to his beloved Lord the only proof of love which is to be trusted, the only one that this Lord asks at our hands, keeping of the commandments (cf. Jn. 14:21). Gueranger, p. 298-302

“Faith which works through charity.” Gal. 5:6
The key to understanding today’s gospel is the realization of what St. Paul tells us: “For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision is of any avail, nor uncircumcision, but faith which works through charity.” Gal. 5:6 Dom Gueranger comments on the absolute need for charity: “If all perfection be included in love,-- if, without love, no virtue produces fruit for heaven,--it is important for us to remember, that love is not of the right kind unless it includes our ‘neighbour’; and it is only after stating this particular, that St. Paul affirms that love fulfilleth the whole law (cf. Rom. 13:10) ... and we are told that the love we have for God is only then what it ought to be, when we love not only Him, but also what He loves, that is, when we love man whom He made to His own likeness (cf. I Jn. 4:20). Gueranger, p. 303-4. In the parable of “The Good Samaritan,” Jesus needed to explain this to the Jews who only saw their neighbour as one of their own race. Dom Gueranger explains how Jesus makes His will known: “This time, He does not make His voice heard amidst thunder and fire, as on Mount Sinai. He, as Man living and conversing with men, reveals to them, and in the most intelligible way possible, the whole import of the eternal commandment which leads to life. (cf. Baruch 4:1) ...our Jesus describes there was a man who went forth from the holy city, and how he fell in with a Samaritan, that is, with a stranger the most despised and disliked of all those whom an inhabitant of Jerusalem looked on as his enemies. And yet, the shrewd ‘lawyer’ who questions Jesus, and, no doubt, all those who have been listening to the answer, are obliged to own that the neighbour, for the poor fellow who had fallen into the hands of robbers, was not so truly the ‘priest,’ or the ‘levite (though both of them were of their own race), as this stranger, this ‘Samaritan,’ who forgets all national grudges as soon as he sees a suffering creature and cannot look on him in any other light than as a fellow-man. Our Jesus made himself thoroughly understood; and everyone present must have well learnt the lesson, that the greatest of all laws, the law of love, admits of no exception, either here or in heaven.” Gueranger p. 304-5
Other Christs
The charity of the Good Samaritan is only possible in the Christian soul by the grace of God which has been given in Baptism, the sacrament of the New Covenant. The Old Testament was only a preparation for the New; only in the New Testament are all souls, not just Moses, given the “glory” of God as St. Paul tells us: “But we all, with faces unveiled, reflecting as in a mirror the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into his very image from glory to glory, as through the Spirit of the Lord.” II Cor. 3:18

The First Friday, 5 September
2014
Now is a good time to continue (or begin) the devotion to the “Nine First Fridays” of the Month. The Sacred Heart of Jesus promised to St. Margaret Mary: "I promise thee in the excessive mercy of My Heart that My all-powerful love will grant to all those who communicate on the First Friday in nine consecutive months, the grace of final penitence; they shall not die in My disgrace nor without receiving the Sacraments; My Divine heart shall be their safe refuge in this last moment." There is no better way to honour the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus than doing the “Nine First Fridays” every month.

First Saturday, 6 September 2014
Our Lady told Sr. Lucia in 1925 “…I promise to assist at the hour of death, with all the graces necessary for salvation, all those who, on the first Saturday of five consecutive months go to confession and receive Holy Communion, recite five decades of the Rosary and keep me company for a quarter of an hour while meditating on the mysteries of the Rosary, with the intention of making reparation to me." If only we would do what Our Lady asks, we would be assured of eternal salvation. Our Lady promises us all the graces necessary for our salvation if we keep The Five First Saturdays! Just think that when you are about to die the Blessed Virgin Mary will be there with you to help you get to heaven! “Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen” How many times have you said these words in your lifetime?

Mission of the Immaculate Mediatrix
6 September 2014

On the First Saturday of every month, we will have our monthly formation program for those who are interested in affiliating themselves with the Marian Spirituality of the Franciscan Friars of the Immaculate. The day begins at 9:30 AM and goes until 4 PM and includes two conferences, Holy Mass, adoration and the rosary. (see flyer on door)
This spirituality is Marian and Franciscan and includes the teachings of St. Francis of Assisi, St. Maximilian Kolbe and other Franciscan saints. “The fundamental aim of the MIM is the fulfilment of God’s plan for the salvation and sanctification of all souls through the maternal mediation of the Immaculate to the supreme glory of the Most Holy Trinity.” (Article 2: Statute)
We hope that all of you will consider joining the MIM and work for your own sanctification and the sanctification of so many souls. Our Lady said at Fatima in 1917: “Many souls will go to hell because no one will pray and sacrifice for them.”


The New Evangelization VI

Popes on “Outside the Church there is no Salvation.”

• Pope Leo XIII (1878–1903), Encyclical Annum Ingressi Sumus: "This is our last lesson to you; receive it, engrave it in your minds, all of you: by God's commandment salvation is to be found nowhere but in the Church."
• Pope St. Pius X (1903–1914), Encyclical Jucunda Sane: "It is our duty to recall to everyone great and small, as the Holy Pontiff Gregory did in ages past, the absolute necessity which is ours, to have recourse to this Church to effect our eternal salvation."
• Pope Benedict XV (1914–1922), Encyclical Ad Beatissimi Apostolorum: "Such is the nature of the Catholic faith that it does not admit of more or less, but must be held as a whole, or as a whole rejected: This is the Catholic faith, which unless a man believe faithfully and firmly, he cannot be saved."
• Pope Pius XI (1922–1939), Encyclical Mortalium Animos: "The Catholic Church alone is keeping the true worship. This is the font of truth, this is the house of faith, this is the temple of God; if any man enter not here, or if any man go forth from it, he is a stranger to the hope of life and salvation… Furthermore, in this one Church of Christ, no man can be or remain who does not accept, recognize and obey the authority and supremacy of Peter and his legitimate successors."
• Pope Pius XII(1939–1958), Encyclical Humani Generis, August 12, 1950: "Some reduce to a meaningless formula the necessity of belonging to the true Church in order to gain eternal salvation."
• Pope Pius XII (1939–1958), Allocution to the Gregorian University (17 October 1953): "By divine mandate the interpreter and guardian of the Scriptures, and the depository of Sacred Tradition living within her, the Church alone is the entrance to salvation: She alone, by herself, and under the protection and guidance of the Holy Spirit, is the source of truth."
• ,Dogmatic Constitution Lumen gentium, 14: "They could not be saved who, knowing that the Catholic Church was founded as necessary by God through Christ, would refuse either to enter it, or to remain in it."
Addenda: Invincible ignorance
• The Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC) #847: This affirmation (outside the Church there is no salvation) is not aimed at those who, through no fault of their own do not know Christ and His Church:
• “Those who, through no fault of their own, do not know the Gospel of Christ or His Church, but who nevertheless seek God with a sincere heart, and, moved by grace, try in their actions to do His will as they know it through the dictates of their conscience –those too may achieve eternal salvation.”-Catechism of the Catholic Church:
(Please note:) Those who do not know the ten commandments must keep the natural law i.e. to do the will of God. This is not easy. This is why St. Anthony Mary Claret said: “It is not necessary to be a Catholic per se, but where else are souls to get rid of their mortal sins.”
• Note also, this is why the great English writer, Gilbert Keith Chesterton said that he wanted a Church in which his sins would be forgiven.

• CCC #848 “Although in ways know to himself, God can lead those who, through no fault of their own, are ignorant of the Gospel, to that faith without which it is impossible to please Him, the Church still has the obligation and also the sacred right to evangelize men.”