Sunday, May 17, 2015

Ascension Sunday, 17 May 2015


Ascension Sunday, 17 May 2015 

 

“Men of Galilee, why do you stand looking up to heaven?  This Jesus who has been taken up from you into heaven shall come in the same way as you have seen Him going up to heaven.” Acts 1:11

 

As we celebrate the Solemnity of the Ascension today, we must raise our thoughts to heaven where Our Lord Jesus has ascended.  Pope St. Leo the Great said:  “Christ’s Ascension is our ascension; our body has the hope of one day being where its glorious Head has preceded it.” This is what Jesus said on the night before He died:  “I go to prepare a place for you, and if I shall go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and will take you to myself; that where I am you also may be.”  Jn. 14: 23.  According to Fr. Gabriel, OCD in his book of meditations, Divine Intimacy, “The Ascension is then, a feast of joyful hope, a sweet foretaste of heaven. By going before us, Jesus our Head has given us the right to follow Him there some day, and we can even say with St. Leo, ‘In the person of Christ, we have penetrated the heights of heaven.’ (Roman Breviary)  As in Christ Crucified, we die to sin; as in the Risen Christ, we rise to the life of grace, so too, we are raised up to heaven in the Ascension of  Christ.  This vital participation  in Christ’s mysteries is the essential consequence of our incorporation in Him.  He is our Head; we, as His members, are totally dependent upon him and intimately bound to His destiny. ‘God, who is rich in mercy,’ says St. Paul, ‘for His exceeding charity wherewith He loved us...hath quickened us together in Christ... and hast raised us up... and hath made us sit together in the heavenly place through Christ Jesus.’ Eph. 2:4-6  Our right to heaven has been given us, our place is ready; it is for us to live in such a way that we may occupy it someday.” Fr. Gabriel, Divine Intimacy,” p. 535

 

“...ascending on high,  He hath led captivity captive.” Ps. 67:19

            In today’s Mass, the Alleluia verses give us a powerful prophecy of  the Messias leading souls into heaven:  “Alleluia. The Lord is in Sinai, in the holy place; ascending on high, He hath led captivity captive.” Ps. 67:19 This image of captives being led into the city of their conquerors was common in Rome when victorious generals would lead their conquests, as their trophies, into the imperial city. So, too, Jesus will lead those whom He has redeemed into heaven as Dom Prosper Gueranger in The Liturgical Year, Vol.9 explains:  “The two Alleluia-versicles give us the words of the royal psalmist, wherein he celebrates the glorious Ascension of the future Messias, the acclamation of the angels, the loud music of heaven’s trumpets, the gorgeous pageant of the countless fortunate captives of limbo whom the conqueror leads up, as His trophy, to heaven.” Gueranger,  p. 179.   How blessed shall we be who are led into heaven as trophies of Christ’s glorious redemption.

 

“Sweet Sorrow of Christ’s Ascension”

          Although Jesus’ Ascension into Heaven has an  element of  sorrow, Jesus told us that our “sorrow will be turned to joy.” (Jn. 16:20)  We can see this especially if we look at Jesus’ Ascension through the eyes of His beloved Mother Mary. The disciples of Jesus used to wonder which of the two sentiments, sadness or joy, had priority in Our Lady’s heart when Jesus ascended into heaven.  Dom Prosper Gueranger comments on this question:  “They (disciples) used to ask themselves, which of the two sentiments was uppermost in her maternal heart, --sadness, that she was to see her Jesus no more, or joy, that He was now going to enter into the glory He so infinitely deserved. The answer was soon found: had not Jesus said to His disciples: ‘If ye loved Me, ye would indeed be glad, because I go to the Father’; Jn. 14:28   Now, who loved Jesus as Mary did?  The Mother’s heart, then, was full of joy at parting with Him.  How was she to think of herself, when there was question of the triumph of her Son and her God?  Could she  that had witnessed the scene of Calvary, do less than desire to see Him glorified, whom she knew to be the sovereign  Lord of all things, -- Him whom, but a short time ago, she had seen rejected by His people, blasphemed, and dying the most ignominious and cruel of deaths?”  Gueranger, p. 170

 

“Sorrow to turn to joy!”

“Amen, Amen I say to you that your shall weep and lament, but the world shall rejoice; and you shall be sorrowful but your sorrow  shall be turned to joy.”   Jn. 16:20

But before our sorrow turns to joy in heaven with Jesus’ return, the angels remind the disciples that they must not stand idle.  They are to return to Jerusalem and await the Holy Spirit. Then the disciples are instructed to go into the whole world and baptize all in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit:  “Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you: and behold I am with you all days, even to consummation of the world.”  Mt. 28:19-20 Jesus gave His disciples this commission just before He ascended into heaven.  Dom Gueranger tells us that the disciples were still caught up in the moment of Jesus’ Ascension: “The disciples are still steadfastly looking up to towards heaven, when lo!  two angels, clad in white robes, appear to them saying: ‘Ye men of Galilee! Why stand ye looking up to heaven? This Jesus, who is taken up from you into heaven, shall so come as ye have seen Him going into heaven!’ Acts 1:10-11 

 

Joy and Triumph in the Ascension

Dom Gueranger again reminds us of the meaning of Jesus’ Ascension: “He has ascended, a Saviour; He is to return a Judge: between these two events is comprised the whole life of the Church on earth. We are therefore living under the reign of Jesus as our Saviour, for He has said: ‘God sent not His Son into the world to judge the world, but that the world might be saved by Him:’ (Jn. 3:17) and to carry out this merciful design He has been giving to His disciples the mission to go throughout the whole world, and invite men, while yet there is time, to accept the mystery of salvation.   .... They love Jesus; they rejoice at the thought of His having entered into His rest. ‘They went back into Jerusalem with great joy.’ Lk. 24:52  These few simple words of the Gospel indicate the spirit of this admirable feast of the Ascension: it is a festival which, not withstanding its soft tinge of sadness, is, more than any other expressive of joy and triumph.” Gueranger, p. 173-4

 

The Need for Prayer

 

Our Holy Father, St. John Paul II spoke of the absolute need of prayer in our lives if we wish to gain eternal salvation:  “…we must pray too because we are fragile and culpable. We need to admit humbly and truly that we are poor creatures, with confused ideas…We are fragile and weak, and in constant need of interior strength and consolation.  Prayer gives us strength for great ideals, for keeping up our faith, charity, purity, generosity;  prayer gives us strength to rise up from indifference and guilt, if we have had the misfortune to give in to temptation and weakness.  Prayer gives light by which to see and to judge from God’s perspective and from eternity.  That is why you must not give up praying!  Don’t let a day go by without praying a little!  Prayer is a duty, but it is also a joy because it is a dialogue with God through Jesus Christ.” Servant of God, Pope John Paul II, Audience with Young People, 14 March 1979   If we want to save our souls, then we must pray for the graces that we need.  This is why Our Lady told the three children at Fatima: “Pray and sacrifice, for many souls will go to hell because no one prays and sacrifices for them.”

 

The Veneration of Relics

         

          To venerate the relics of the saints is a profession of belief in several doctrines of the Catholic faith: (1) the belief in everlasting life for those who have obediently witnessed to Christ and His Holy Gospel here on earth; (2) the truth of the resurrection of the body for all persons on the last day; (3) the doctrine of the splendour of the human body and the respect which all should show toward the bodies of both the living and the deceased; (4) the belief in the special intercessory power which the saints enjoy in heaven because of their intimate relationship with Christ the King; and (5) the truth of our closeness to the saints because of our connection in the communion of saints we as members of the Church militant or pilgrim Church, they as members of the Church triumphant.

          The relics of the saints and their veneration is just another in the long line of treasures which Jesus Christ has given to His chaste bride, the Church. These relics summon us to appreciate more profoundly not only the heroic men and women, boys and girls who have served the Master so selflessly and generously, but especially the love and mercy of the Almighty who called these His followers to the bliss of unending life in His eternal kingdom.

          Fr. John A. Hardon in the Modern Catholic Dictionary says, “Relics are of three classes: the first is part of the saint’s body and is the type placed on the altar stone; the second is part of the clothing or anything used during the saint’s life; and the third is any other object, such as a piece of cloth, that has been touched to a first class relic.” p. 461

          Bl. Louis and Zelie Martin were the parents of St. Therese, the Little Flower. Both had tried to enter religious life, but God had other plans for them.  They had nine children in all; four died at an early age and the other five girls all entered the religious life. The last of the children was St. Therese who was born when her Mother Zelie was forty years old.  Zelie died four years later.   Bl. Louis and Bl. Zelie are important for us today as they are wonderful models of what all Catholic  Mothers and Fathers should be in the family.  We need to pray to them today for our own families and for all the families of the world!  How blessed we are to have them in our presence in our Cathedral.

VISIT OF THE RELICS OF

BLESSED LOUIS & BLESSED ZELIE MARTIN

PLYMOUTH CATHEDRAL

 

http://www.plymouth-diocese.org.uk/sites/www.plymouth-diocese.org.uk/files/styles/fixed_height_thumb/public/relics.jpg?itok=IJetoXWg

Friday, 15 May

18.00         Reception of the Holy Relics by Bishop Mark O’Toole

19.00 Mass with anointing of         the sick

               Cathedral open for              private veneration

21.00 Night Prayer of the             Church

 

Saturday, 16 May

09.30 Morning Prayer of the          Church

10.00 Mass

               Devotions and                    Veneration

12.00 Mass for families and   renewal of Marriage Vows

               Principal Celebrant –           Bishop Mark

 

Sunday, 17 May

08.00 Mass

10.00 Solemn Mass

               Cathedral open for              Private Veneration

17.00 Evening Prayer of the          Church & Benediction

18.00 Mass

 

Monday, 18 May

09.00 Morning Prayer

10.00 Mass with schools

 

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Fifth Sunday After Easter 10 May 2015


Fifth Sunday After Easter

10 May 2015

 

Amen, amen, I say to you if you ask the Father anything in my name, he will give it to you.”  Jn. 16:23

 

Today’s liturgy, as in the past Sundays after Easter, prepares us for Jesus’ Ascension, when He will leave His Apostles, and opens the way to Pentecost, when He will send them the Holy Spirit to  enlighten and strengthen them. Jesus also wants to console the Apostles for His absence by promising them that they can ask the Father anything “in His Name” and they will receive it:  Amen, amen, I say to you if you ask the Father anything in my name, he will give it to you.”  Jn. 16:23  This is truly a consoling promise to the Apostles who were so forlorn on hearing Jesus’ words of  departure.  They no longer have to fear being alone, for not only will Jesus always be there for them, but also the Father. Jesus’ promise of asking the Father for help in His Name in today’s Gospel (Jn. 16:23-30) and the teaching of today’s Epistle from St. James (1:22-27) provides us with a solid teaching on efficacious prayer.  If we pray, as Jesus taught His Apostles to do, then we have absolute confidence that we will be heard.  All we need to do is to pray “in the Name of Jesus” with a good conscience, with humility and with confidence.

 

Ask “in the Name of Jesus”

           

When we pray “in the Name of Jesus,” our prayers and our good works obtain a superabundant value as they are founded on the infinite merits of Jesus Christ.  We must remember that we are unprofitable servants (cf. Lk. 17:10) who can do nothing (cf. Jn. 15:5) of ourselves and that our sufficiency comes from Jesus Crucified. “Consequently,” according to Fr. Gabriel in Divine Intimacy, “the first condition of prayer made ‘in the name of Jesus’ is humility, an ever deeper  and more realistic sense of our nothingness. It must be complemented by the second condition, a boundless confidence in the merits of Jesus, which surpass all our poverty, misery, necessities and needs. In view of Jesus’ infinite merits, we can never ask too much in  His Name: we can never be too bold in imploring the plenitude of divine grace for our souls, in aspiring to that sanctity which is hidden, but genuine. ...Moreover, there is no creature of good will, no matter how weak and insignificant, who, ‘in the Name of Jesus,’ cannot aspire to sanctity.” Fr. Gabriel, p. 524

 

Be ye doers of the word

 and not hearers only.” Ja. 1:22

 

“However, in order to make our prayer effective, a third condition is required: our life must correspond to our prayer, our faith must be translated into good works.  ‘Be ye doers of the word and not hearers only, deceiving your own selves. For if a man be a hearer of the word and not a doer, he shall be compared to a man beholding his own countenance in a glass. For he beheld himself, and went his way, and presently forgot what manner of man he was.’ Ja. 1:22 This strong exhortation of St. James, which is found in today’s Epistle is an urgent reminder of the practical character of the Christian life. Vain is our prayer, vain our confidence  in God, if we do not add our generous efforts to perform all our duties, to live up to our high vocation.  We can add, and we should, hope for everything in the ‘Name of Jesus,’ but He expects a constant   effort on our part to be entirely faithful to Him.”  Fr. Gabriel, p. 524-5.

 

“...through our Lord Jesus Christ.”

 

            Cornelius a Lapide in his Commentary on the Gospel of St. John, also reminds us why it is so important to pray genuinely “in the Name of Jesus”:  “...To ask in the name of Christ is to ask through  Christ, or through Christ’s merits, dignity, and authority. For Christ, by His passion and death, merited that we should obtain from God whatever we ask in His name. Therefore this obtaining, with respect to us, is grace, and with respect to Christ is but justice. ‘His name’ signifies in Scripture His strength, virtue, merits, grace, dignity and                             authority. Therefore to ask  in the name of Christ, is to ask while counting on His merits, and to trust in them, not in our own; that God may look, not on our  unworthiness and our sins, but upon the face of His anointed, and on account of His sanctity and merits grant us that which we do not deserve. Christ therefore points here not merely to God, but to God incarnate, and obedient even unto the death of the cross. For He merited, that the Father should hear our prayers. This is the Church’s interpretation, for she ends all her prayers ‘through our Lord Jesus Christ.’ Thus the Jews used to pray through the merits of their fathers, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. But we Christians pray through the merits of Christ, who infinitely surpasses their merits.” a Lapide, p . 660.

 

For the good of our salvation

Since Jesus promised us that the Father would answer all our prayers, if we pray in His Name, we might ask why then are our prayers not answered as we wish? Cornelius a Lapide answers this observation: “Again, to ask in the name of Christ, is to ask those things which He wishes and desires to be given us, those namely which concern the salvation of the soul.  Hence such a prayer is effectual, and is heard by God....The reason they obtain not, is because they ask not the things which they ought, not in the way they ought....It requires contrition for sin, so that he who prays may be, or may heartily wish to become, a friend of God.  Sinners therefore, wilfully persisting in sin, are not heard by God.... It requires great faith and hope, or confidence, that we shall obtain what we ask for through the merits of Christ.  This confidence many have not, and  therefore they obtain not... Lastly, St. Augustine rightly observes, ‘God occasionally refuses what we ask for, because this is more expedient for our salvation and His glory. God therefore hears us, not according to our wishes, but according to our salvation.’”  a Lapide, p. 660-1

 

The Need for Prayer

 

            Pope St. John Paul II, spoke of the absolute need for prayer in our lives: “… we must pray too because we are fragile and culpable. We need to admit humbly and truly that we are poor creatures, with confused ideas…We are fragile and weak, and in constant need of interior strength and consolation.  Prayer gives us strength for great ideals, for keeping up our faith, charity, purity, generosity;  prayer gives us strength to rise up from indifference and guilt, if we have had the misfortune to give into temptation and weakness.  Prayer gives light by which to see and to judge from God’s perspective and from eternity.  That is why you must not give up praying!  Don’t let a day go by without praying a little!  Prayer is a duty, but it is also a joy because it is a dialogue with God through Jesus Christ.” (St. John Paul II, Audience with Young People, 14 March 1979)

 

Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament

 

“Could you not, then, watch one hour with Me?” Mt. 26:40

 

 

From  HOLY FATHER'S PASTORAL LETTER TO THE CATHOLICS OF IRELAND”  (3 March 2010) “....  Particular attention should also be given to Eucharistic adoration, and in every diocese there should be churches or chapels specifically devoted to this purpose. I ask parishes, seminaries, religious houses and monasteries to organise periods of Eucharistic adoration, so that all have an opportunity to take part. Through intense prayer before the real presence of the Lord, you can make reparation for the sins of abuse that have done so much harm, at the same time imploring the grace of renewed strength and a deeper sense of mission on the part of all bishops, priests, religious and lay faithful.”  (No. 14) 

 

May is the Month of Mary:

 

Pope St. John Paul II spoke of the importance of devotion to Our Lady and the Family Rosary: “The Christian family finds and consolidates its identity in prayer.  Make the daily effort to find a time to pray together, to talk with Our Lord and listen to his voice. How beautiful it is when the family prays in the evening, even though it be only a part of the Rosary.  The family that prays together stays together; a family that prays is a family that is saved.  Act in such a way that your home may be a place of Christian faith and virtue through your praying together.” (Address to families, 24 March 1984)

 

May Crowning and Consecration

 

We were sorry to postpone our May Crowning last week as the weather was not good.  Today, 10 May 2015, we will have a May Crowning of Our Lady and a Consecration to the Immaculate (according to St. Maximilian Kolbe) at our Lourdes Grotto after Mass.  This is a most important devotion as it honours Our Holy Mother during her special Month of May, and it binds us to her as her special “possession and property.”  St. Maximilian Kolbe spoke of all those who are consecrated to the Immaculate: “She penetrates our soul and directs its faculties with unlimited power. We truly belong to Her. Therefore, we are with Her always and everywhere...”(SK 461)

And further still: “We are Hers, of the Immaculate, unlimitedly Hers, perfectly Hers, we are, as it were, Her very self. She, by means of us, loves the good God. She, with our poor  heart, loves Her divine Son.  We become the means by which the Immaculate loves Jesus, and Jesus, seeing that we are Her property, a part, as it were, of His most loving Mother, loves Her in and through us. What beautiful mysteries!”  Sk 508  

 St. Maximilian declared that those who are consecrated to the Immaculate would be a means of holiness and grace to others (especially their own family): “She needs to be brought into all hearts,’ so that She, upon entering into these hearts, may give birth there to the sweet Jesus, to God, and bring Him up even to that perfect age. What a beautiful mission!”  SK508

 

St. Louis de Montfort tells us of Total Consecration to Mary: “This devotion consists, therefore, in giving ourselves entirely to the Most Blessed Virgin that, through her we may belong entirely to Jesus Christ. We must give her: (1) our body with all its senses and members; (2) our soul with its powers; (3) our material possessions and all that we may acquire; (4) our interior and spiritual possessions—our merits, our virtues and our good works, past, present, and future; in short, all that we possess in the order of nature, in the order of grace …” St. Louis de Montfort, True Devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary, p. 88-9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Fourth Sunday after Easter 3rd May 2015


Fourth Sunday After Easter

3 May 2015

 

For if I do not go, the Advocate will not come to you,  but if I go, I will send him to you.”  Jn. 16:7

 

          During this Eastertide, the Church prepares us for the coming of the Holy Spirit. In his book,   Divine Intimacy, Fr. Gabriel, OCD  tells us: “Only Jesus’ death could merit this great gift for us, and it was not until after His Ascension into heaven that the Holy Spirit, the Envoy of the Father and  the Son, could descend upon the Church.” (p. 503)   The Apostles were about to lose the physical presence of their beloved Master, but Jesus would not leave them orphans; He would send them His Spirit who would teach them all things: “But the Advocate, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, he will teach you all things, and bring to your mind whatever I have said to you.” Jn. 14:26  Jesus, by His passion  and death, had  conquered sin and death and merited for the Apostles and His Church the coming of the Holy Spirit.  Fr. Gabriel tells us: “The sending of the Holy Spirit to our souls is the principal fruit of the Passion of Jesus.”  Gabriel, Ibid.  p. 504   In today’s Epistle (Jas. 1:17-21), St. James tells us that   the best way to prepare ourselves for the coming of the Holy Spirit is to avoid sin: “Therefore, casting aside all uncleanness and abundance of malice, with meekness receive the ingrafted word, which is able to save your souls.” Ja. 1:21 Whoever has the truth and the light of Christ rejects sin; such is the first lesson of the Holy Spirit.

 

“And when he has come, he will convict the world of sin, and of justice and of judgment: of sin....because they do not believe in me.”Jn. 16:8-9

Msgr. Patrick Boylan in his book, “The Sunday Gospels and Epistles,” tells us that the Holy Spirit will convict the world of sin:  Our Lord had challenged His enemies to convict Him of sin—but the world will itself be convicted of sin by the Spirit-aided preaching of the Apostles. The sin which the world will be shown to have specially committed is the sin of unbelief. The preaching of the Apostles, aided and confirmed by the Holy Spirit, will bring home to the adversaries of Christ the sin they have committed in rejecting Him.”

 

“Convicted.... of justice, because I go to the Father, and you will see me no more.” Jn. 16:10

            The second lesson of the Holy Spirit is to convict the world of its injustice in not believing that Jesus was indeed “the Just One and the Chosen One of God.” “The Paraclete (Advocate, Holy Spirit) will also convict the world of its folly in regard to justice. It had looked on Jesus as a profaner of the Sabbath and blasphemer: but the Resurrection and Ascension of Christ will be used by the Spirit  to prove that Christ is indeed the Just One, and the Chosen One of God.  The charisms of the Spirit and the growth of Christ’s Church will help to show its divine character and thus completely to vindicate its Founder.  Thus even though the disciples  must give up the joy of having Jesus visibly with them, their deprivations  will ultimately help to establish the greatness and holiness of their Master.

 

Convicted... of judgment, because the prince of this world has already been judged.”  Jn. 16:11

            “In the third place,  the Paraclete will show the world to be wrong in regard to ‘judgment.’ The enemies of Jesus had believed  that, with the death of Jesus, their case against Him had been finally established. The Paraclete will show that it is they who have been  condemned, with their leader, the Devil, ‘the Prince of this world.’ (cf. Jn. 12:31)

           

Good triumphs over evil”

“The Paraclete will prove, therefore, that the ‘world’ is sinful, that justice (righteousness) is on the side of Christ, and that condemnation of the powers of evil has definitely begun. To the ‘world,’ then, belongs sin: to Jesus belongs justice and (the) verdict of victory.  Thus, in a word, it will appear after the coming of the Spirit that good triumphs over evil, that holiness ultimately judges sin, and Christ condemns and overthrows Satan.” (cv. Lk. 10:18, 11:22)  Boylan, Ibid. p. 50

 

Apostles enlightened by the Holy Spirit

As Jesus had said, “...he will teach you all things” (Jn. 14:26). The Holy Spirit will enlighten and strengthen the Apostles to understand all that Jesus has spoken to them.  “The Holy Spirit is the Spirit of Truth: He brings truth home to the minds of men. He will guide the Apostles into the full truth: He will lead them gradually but steadily towards the full comprehension of Christ, Who is Truth itself.

“The ‘full truth’ is not fullness of knowledge of nature or history, but Christ---‘the Way and the Truth’ Jn. 14:6.  The Spirit is the guide who points the way to the Truth. (cf. Ps. 25:5 & 57:7) To the Spirit is here assigned the work which in the Psalter (Psalms), belongs to the Spirit of Yahweh.   ...The Spirit will announce what is to come. He will make known through the Apostles the new economy which will begin at Pentecost.

 

The Holy Spirit ‘convicts’ the world today.

“As the Jews rejected Christ in the Apostolic Age, so others reject Him in our day, and as the Jews foolishly believed that they had overthrown Christ and destroyed His work, so there are groups of men—even large sections of nations—today who aim at destroying Christ’s work, and representing it as useless, if not noxious, for humanity. In spite of all these new enemies of Christ, the life of the Church goes on, and is deepened and widened, and its capacity to adapt itself to every need of the time becomes every day more obvious.  Now, therefore, as in the Apostolic days, the Holy Spirit is showing up –‘convicting’—the world in regard to justice. ...The daily sacramental life, and the never-ceasing spiritual growth of the Church, are the Holy Spirit’s answer to false teaching and persecution—whereby He ‘convicts’ the world of ‘judgment.’” Boylan, Ibid., p. 52-3

 

 

May is the Month of Mary:

During his pontificate, our beloved Pope St. John Paul II showed how the Holy Spirit is active in our families if we pray together: “The Christian family finds and consolidates its identity in prayer.  Make the daily effort to find a time to pray together, to talk with Our Lord and listen to his voice. How beautiful it is when the family prays in the evening, even though it be only a part of the Rosary.  ‘The family that prays together stays together’; a family that prays is a family that is saved.  Act in such a way that your home may be a place of Christian faith and virtue through your praying together.” (Address to families, 24 March 1984) 

 

May Crowning and Consecration

 

On Sunday, 3  May 2015, we will have a May Crowning of Our Lady and a Consecration to the Immaculate (according to St. Maximilian Kolbe) at our Lourdes Grotto after Mass.  This is a most important devotion as it honours Our Holy Mother during her special Month of May, and it binds us to her as her special “possession and property.”  St. Maximilian Kolbe spoke of all those who are consecrated to the Immaculate “She penetrates our soul and directs its faculties with unlimited power. We truly belong to Her. Therefore, we are with Her always and everywhere...”(SK 461)

And further still: “We are Hers, of the Immaculate, unlimitedly Hers, perfectly Hers, we are, as it were, Her very self. She, by means of us, loves the good God. She, with our poor  heart, loves Her divine Son.  We become the means by which the Immaculate loves Jesus, and Jesus, seeing that we are Her property, a part, as it were, of His most loving Mother, loves Her in and through us. What beautiful mysteries!”  SK 508  

 St. Maximilian declared that those who are consecrated to the Immaculate would be a means of holiness and grace to others (especially their own family): “She needs to be brought into all hearts,’ so that She, upon entering into these hearts, may give birth there to the sweet Jesus, to God, and bring Him up even to that perfect age. What a beautiful mission!”  SK508

 

            St. Louis de Montfort tells us of Total Consecration to Mary: “This devotion consists, therefore, in giving ourselves entirely to the Most Blessed Virgin that, through her we may belong entirely to Jesus Christ. We must give her: (1) our body with all its senses and members; (2) our soul with its powers; (3) our material possessions and all that we may acquire; (4) our interior and spiritual possessions—our merits, our virtues and our good works, past, present, and future; in short, all that we possess in the order of nature, in the order of grace …” St. Louis de Montfort, True Devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary, p. 88

 

First Friday:  1 May 2015

Now is a good time to continue (or begin) the  devotion to the “Nine  First Fridays” of the Month.   The Sacred Heart of Jesus promised to St. Margaret Mary:  "I promise thee in the excessive mercy of My Heart that My all-powerful love will grant to all those who communicate on the First Friday in nine consecutive months, the grace of final penitence; they shall not die in My disgrace nor without receiving the Sacraments; My Divine heart shall be their safe refuge in this last moment." 

 

Mission of the Immaculate Mediatrix

(MIM)    2 May 2015

 

On the First Saturday of every month, we will have our monthly formation program for those who interested in affiliating themselves with the Marian Spirituality of the Franciscan Friars of the Immaculate. The day begins at 9:30 AM and goes until 4 PM and includes two conferences, Holy Mass, adoration and the rosary. (see flyer on door)

  This spirituality is Marian and Franciscan and includes the teachings of St. Francis of Assisi,   St. Maximilian Kolbe and other Franciscan saints. “The fundamental aim of the MIM is the fulfilment of God’s plan for the salvation and sanctification of all souls through the maternal mediation of the Immaculate to the supreme glory of the Most Holy Trinity.”  (Article 2: Statute)

It is most important at this time in our world to come together and learn about Our Lady and her messages especially Fatima.  Pope John Paul II:  On November 9, 1976 said in the USA as Karol Cardinal Wojtyla:  “We are now standing in face of the greatest historical confrontation humanity has gone through.  I do not think that the wide circles of American society or the wide circles of  the Christian community realize this fully.  We are now facing the final confrontation between the Church and the Anti-Church, of the Gospel versus the anti-gospel.”

We hope that all of you will consider joining the MIM and work for your own sanctification and the sanctification of  so many souls who are in danger of being lost for all eternity in hell as Our Lady said at Fatima. 

 

 

The First Saturday: 2 May 2015

 

Our Lady told Sr. Lucia in 1925 “…I promise to assist at the hour of death, with all the graces necessary for salvation, all those who, on the first Saturday of five consecutive months go to confession and receive Holy Communion, recite five decades of the Rosary and keep me company for a quarter of an hour while meditating on the mysteries of the Rosary, with the intention of making reparation to me."  If only we would do what Our Lady asks, we would be assured of eternal salvation.  Our Lady promises us all the graces necessary for our salvation if we keep The Five First Saturdays! 

 

Why the Rosary is so important!

 

 

“Give me an army saying the Rosary and I will conquer the world.”   Pope Blessed Pius IX

“If you persevere in reciting the Rosary, this will be a most probable sign of your eternal salvation.”    Blessed Alan de la Roche

“The greatest method of praying is to pray the Rosary.”    Saint Francis de Sales



“When the Holy Rosary is said well, it gives Jesus and Mary more glory and is more meritorious than any other prayer.”
Saint Louis de Montfort

“The Holy Rosary is the storehouse of countless blessing.”    Blessed Alan de la Roche

“One day, through the Rosary and the Scapular, Our Lady will save the world.”   Saint Dominic

“If you say the Rosary faithfully unto death, I do assure you that, in spite of the gravity of your sins, ‘you will receive a never-fading crown of glory’ (1 St. Peter 5:4).”   Saint Louis de Montfort



“You must know that when you say ‘hail’ Mary, she immediately greets you! Don’t think that she is one of those rude women of whom there are so many—on the contrary, she is utterly courteous and pleasant. If you greet her, she will answer you right away and converse with you!”      Saint Bernardine of Siena