Tuesday, July 8, 2014

Fourth Sunday after Pentecost 6th July 2014

Fourth Sunday after Pentecost,
6 July 2014

“Master, the whole night through we have toiled and have taken nothing; but at thy word I will lower the net.” Lk. 5: 5
Fr. Gabriel of St. Magdalene in his book of meditations, Divine Intimacy, tells us: “Two ideas dominate the liturgy of today’s Mass: great confidence in God and an acute awareness of our human misery and insufficiency. These two ideas are closely connected, for it is the consciousness of our nothingness which leads us to put all our confidence in God, and the greater the confidence becomes in us, the more convinced we are of our nothingness. The Mass begins with a cry of unshakable hope: ‘The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear?’ (Introit) The Lord is with me in the Blessed Sacrament of the altar, the Lord comes to me in Holy Communion. What can separate me from Him? What can make me fear? Yet I know my weakness; I have ever before my eyes the remembrance of my failures and infidelities. How great, then, is my need to humbly repeat the beautiful prayer of the of the Gradual: ‘Save us, O Lord, and pardon our sins.. Help us, O God, our Saviour, for the glory of Your Name.’ Yes, in spite of the continual help of divine grace, in spite of so many confessions and communions, I have to acknowledge new failures every day; daily, I must begin anew.

Confidence in Jesus’ Redemption
“The struggle is arduous and painful, but in today’s Epistle (Rom. 8: 18-23), St. Paul reminds us that ‘the sufferings of this time are not worthy to be compared with the glory to come that shall be revealed in us.’ Rom. 8:18 This thought is one of consolation, hope and confidence; it does not, however, prevent us from longing for freedom and complete redemption. This is what the Apostle experienced when he said: ‘We also, who have the first fruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for the adoption of the sons of God, the redemption of our body in Christ Jesus.’ Rom. 8:23 The more we suffer because of our wretchedness, the more we should run to Jesus, with full confidence in the power of His Redemption.

“Without Me, you can do nothing.” Jn. 15:5.
“Today’s Gospel (Lk. 5:1-11) is a practical demonstration of the words of Jesus: ‘Without Me, you can do nothing’ (Jn. 15:5). Simon and his companions had been fishing all night and had caught nothing; that is all they had been able to do by themselves. If we have had some little experience in the spiritual life, we will recognize that is often our situation too. How many efforts we have made to rid ourselves of this or that attachment, to forget injuries, to adapt ourselves to our neighbour’s way of doing things, to subject our will to another’s! And yet, after all these attempts, we find our hands empty, like Peter’s nets. Let us not be discouraged; if we can humbly acknowledge our failure itself will turn into victory. So it happened to Peter after he admitted publicly that he had ‘taken nothing’ (Lk. 5:5). St. Therese of the Child Jesus comments: ‘Had the Apostle caught some small fish, perhaps our divine Master would not have worked a miracle; but he had caught nothing, and so through the power and goodness of God his nets were soon filled with great fishes. Such is Our Lord’s way. He gives as God, with divine generosity, but He insists on humility of heart.’” (Letters of St. Therese) Fr. Gabriel, Divine Intimacy, p. 648-9

“The kingdom of heaven”
In a spiritual interpretation of today’s gospel, Dom Prosper Gueranger in his book, The Liturgical Year Vol. 11 comments on the allegorical interpretation of the fathers who relate the gospel story to the Church: “…As she now is, the Church is the multitude, without distinction between good and bad; but afterwards—that is, after the resurrection—the good alone will compose the Church, and their number will be forever fixed. ‘The kingdom of heaven,’ says Our Lord, ‘is like to a net cast into the sea, and gathering together of all kind of fishes; which, when it was filled, they drew out; they chose out the good into vessels, but the bad cast forth.’ Mt. 13: 47-8 To speak with St. Augustine, the fishers of men have cast forth their nets; they have taken the multitude of Christians which we see in wonderment; they have filled the two ships with them, the two peoples, Jew and Gentile. But what is this we are told? The multitude weighs down the ships, even to the risk of sinking them; it is what we witness now: the pressing and mingled crowd of the baptized is a burden to the Church. Many Christians there are who live badly; they are a trouble to, and keep back, the good. Worse than these, there are those who tear the nets by their schisms or their heresies; they are impatient of the yoke of unity, and will not come to the banquet of Christ; they are pleased with themselves. Under pretext that they cannot live with the bad, they break the net which kept them in the apostolic track, and they die far off the shore. …Let us not imitate their folly. If grace has made us holy, let us be patient with the bad while living in this world’s waters. Let the sight of them drive us neither to live as they do, nor to leave the Church. The shore is not far off, where those on the right, or the good, will alone be permitted to land, and from which the wicked will be repulsed and cast into the abyss.” Gueranger, p. 128-29

Faith in Jesus Christ
Fr. Gabriel reminds us of the faith that we need to have in Jesus Christ. “In spite of our good will to advance in virtue, Our Lord will not permit us to have any success until He sees that we are thoroughly convinced of our own weakness and inability; to give us this conviction, He lets us, as He let Peter, work all night without catching anything (cf. Lk. 5:5). But afterwards, as He sees our growing awareness of our poverty and our willingness to admit it openly, He will come to our aid. We must, then, have great faith in Him, never allowing ourselves to give up through lack of success. Every day, relying ‘on His word,’ we must begin anew. If we have learned not to trust in our own strength, we must also learn to have complete confidence in the divine aid. If we have caught nothing until now, perhaps it is our lack of unshakable confidence that is the cause, and this deficiency, besides being displeasing to Jesus, paralyzed our spiritual life. Then let us repeat with Peter in a similar cry of confidence: “…Lord, at Thy word, I will let down the net’ (Lk. 5: 5). And let us repeat it every day, every moment without growing weary.” Fr. Gabriel, p. 649-50

“At thy word I will let down my net.” Lk. 5:6

Cornelius a Lapide in Commentary of St. Luke’s Gospel, tells us: “Because Peter had said, ‘At Thy word I will let down my net…’ Behold, this is the fruit of obedience. Jesus did this: 1. In order that by providing them with food, He might prepare them for their vocation and discipleship. As if to say: I have decided to call you away from fishing in order to be my disciples; make no excuse, saying that you must work for your livelihood as fishermen. Behold, I supply you with this miraculous draft of fishes, so that you might believe in Me, that even without fishing I shall provide you with your food and all things necessary for life, more easily and more abundantly than you can provide them yourselves by your toil and labor. 2. To teach from this plentiful catch of fish, that they were soon to become successful fishers of men, when they were called by Christ to do so.” A Lapide, p. 352 So, too, Jesus calls us to do His will in our vocation in life, and, as St. Thomas Aquinas teaches, He will always give us the necessary graces for the vocation to which we have been called.


The First Friday, 4 July 2014
Now is a good time to continue (or begin) the devotion to the “Nine First Fridays” of the Month. The Sacred Heart of Jesus promised to St. Margaret Mary: "I promise thee in the excessive mercy of My Heart that My all-powerful love will grant to all those who communicate on the First Friday in nine consecutive months, the grace of final penitence; they shall not die in My disgrace nor without receiving the Sacraments; My Divine heart shall be their safe refuge in this last moment." There is no better way to honour the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus than doing the “Nine First Fridays” every month


Mission of the Immaculate Mediatrix(MIM)
5 July 2014

On the First Saturday of every month, we will have our monthly formation program for those interested in affiliating themselves with the Marian Spirituality of the Franciscan Friars of the Immaculate. The day begins at 9:30 AM and goes until 4 PM and includes two conferences, Holy Mass, adoration and the rosary. (see flyer on door)
This spirituality is Marian and Franciscan and includes the teachings of St. Francis of Assisi, St. Maximilian Kolbe and other Franciscan saints. “The fundamental aim of the MIM is the fulfilment of God’s plan for the salvation and sanctification of all souls through the maternal mediation of the Immaculate to the supreme glory of the Most Holy Trinity.” (Article 2: Statute)
It is most important at this time in our world to come together and learn about Our Lady and her messages especially Fatima. Pope John Paul II: On November 9, 1976 said in the USA as Karol Cardinal Wojtyla: “We are now standing in face of the greatest historical confrontation humanity has gone through. I do not think that the wide circles of American society or the wide circles of the Christian community realize this fully. We are now facing the final confrontation between the Church and the Anti-Church, of the Gospel versus the anti-gospel.”
We hope that all of you will consider joining the MIM and work for your own sanctification and the sanctification of so many souls who are in danger of being lost for all eternity in hell as Our Lady said at Fatima.

Mission of the Immaculate Mediatrix
First Saturday Day: 5 July 2014
9:30 AM Tea and coffee: St. Joseph’s Hall)
10:00 AM- First Conference: “
11:30 AM- Holy Mass in the chapel
12:30 PM- Lunch
1:30 PM- Quiet Time: Adoration, Confession, Rosary & Divine Mercy Chaplet
3:00 PM- Benediction
3:15 PM- Second Conference:
4:00-4:30 PM- Tea and Departure


The First Saturday of the Month
5 July 2014
Our Lady told Sr. Lucia in 1925 “…I promise to assist at the hour of death, with all the graces necessary for salvation, all those who, on the first Saturday of five consecutive months go to confession and receive Holy Communion, recite five decades of the Rosary and keep me company for a quarter of an hour while meditating on the mysteries of the Rosary, with the intention of making reparation to me." If only we would do what Our Lady asks, we would be assured of eternal salvation. Our Lady promises us all the graces necessary for our salvation if we keep The Five First Saturdays! Just think that when you are about to die that the Blessed Virgin Mary will be there with you to help you get to heaven! “Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen” How many times have you said these words in your lifetime?








Monday, June 30, 2014

SS Peter and Paul 29th June 2014

Feast of Sts. Peter and Paul
Sunday 29 June 2014

“I say to thee that thou are Peter and upon this rock I will build my Church.” Mt. 16:16

On this feastday, we celebrate the Solemnity of the two great Apostles of the Church, Sts. Peter and Paul. Both were men who overcame weakness; St. Peter denied Christ and St. Paul persecuted the Church. Both repented and worked tirelessly to spread the gospel to all nations. Eventually, both proved their great love for Christ by dying as martyrs for the faith.

The Primacy of St. Peter as the Vicar of Christ
Today’s gospel from St. Matthew (16:13-19) tells us how Jesus conferred the Keys of the Kingdom upon St. Peter. First, Our Lord changed the apostle’s name. He would no longer be called Simon, but Peter because, as the name signifies, he would be the rock upon which Christ would build His Church. Peter, as rock is an image that has endured for centuries to our present day. Christ likens Peter to a rock because he will have the strength of the foundation of His Church. Thus the image of rock illustrates the primacy of Peter and his successors, the Popes of the Roman Catholic Church. St. Peter and all the Pope enjoy primacy because they govern the Roman Catholic Church which alone has the four marks of truth: One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic. It is indeed the “One only” Church, whose sole founder and head is Christ who chose Peter to represent Him after he proclaimed: “Thou are the Christ, the Son of the Living God.” Mt. 16:16. St. Peter is the Head of the Church. St. Ambrose would say, “Where Peter is, there is the Church.” This means that wherever we find the Pope, St. Peter’s successor and the Vicar of Christ, there is the Church. This sense of belonging to the Church should fill us with great joy. Today’s feast in honour of the two great Apostles, Sts. Peter and Paul, should inspire in us great joy in thanksgiving to God, the Father, for bringing us to the Church established by His Son and sanctified by His Holy Spirit. St. Cyprian reminds us of the deep gratitude which we rightly must have for the Catholic Church: “He cannot have God for His Father who does not have the Church for his Mother”

“Thou are the Christ, the Son of the Living God.” Mt. 16:16
When we honour St. Peter today, we are in reality honouring Christ whom St. Peter knows to be the Son of God. Jesus is the chief cornerstone of the Church, and St. Peter is the rock upon which Jesus built His Church. As the Vicar of Christ on earth. We also are, as St. Peter tells us, that we are the “living stones built upon a spiritual house, a holy priesthood,” (I Pt. 2:5) with Christ Jesus as the cornerstone. Like St. Teresa of Avila, we should be “a daughter (or son) of the Church.” We should be true children of the Church who are willing to sacrifice ourselves for the needs of Holy Mother Church. In today’s Epistle ( I Pet. 1:1-7) St. Peter reminds of us of joy which we will have in suffering for Christ: “Wherein you shall greatly rejoice, if now you must for a little time made sorrowful in divers temptations: that the trial of your faith, much more precious than gold (which is tried by the fire), may be found unto praise and glory and honour, at the appearance of Jesus Christ our Lord.” Today, the Holy Roman Catholic Church is suffering in its members who are persecuted for the Catholic faith. If we truly love Christ, then we will love the Catholic faith and be willing to suffer all that God sends us for the good of all the members of Christ’s Mystical Body, the Church Militant on earth.

St. Paul, the Apostle of the Gentiles
We are all familiar with St. Paul, known formerly as Saul, a zealous Jew, who persecuted the faith of the early Christians so much that he rode to Damascus in order to bring them back to Jerusalem for punishment. It was on his way to Damascus, that Saul was converted by being knocked off his horse by blinding light. Once he knew that he was actually persecuting Jesus Christ, the Nazarean, in the person of the members of His Church he was never the same again. Now, as Paul, all that mattered to him was to be like Jesus Christ, poor and crucified: “It is no longer I that live, but Christ lives in me. And the life that I live now in the flesh, I live in faith of the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself up for me.” Gal. 2:20 St. Paul imitated Christ when he gave himself totally to spreading the gospel. He was unconcerned about himself and suffered all kinds of dangers and failures: “Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or hunger, or nakedness, or danger, or the sword.” Rom. 8:5 St. Paul knows that he is the instrument chosen by God to bring the gospel to all the people who were not Jews, that is, the Gentile world: “But when it pleased him who from my mother’s womb set me apart and called me by his grace to reveal his Son in me that I might preach him among the Gentiles…Gal. 1:15-6

The Blessings of the Grace of God
St. Paul’s conversion is a powerful lesson to all of us on the power of God’s grace. Paul, formerly Saul, was so zealous for the Jewish faith that he was blinded to the goodness of the Christians. He may even have seen Jesus and also been blinded like so many other Jews of his day. St. Augustine tells us that St. Paul’s passionate zeal was like an impenetrable jungle. Although it was a great obstacle, it nevertheless showed St. Paul’s natural talent. God who sees the heart knew this and gave Paul the grace of conversion. St. Paul would allude to the fact that he and all Christians were chosen from all eternity: “He chose us in him before the foundation of the world.” Eph. 1:4 “He has redeemed us and called us with a holy calling, not according to our works, but according to his own purpose and grace which was granted to us in Christ Jesus before the world existed. II Tim 1:9. Oh, how mysterious and powerful was the grace of God in the life of St. Paul.

Zealous Apostles
St. Peter and St. Paul, lived not for themselves, but for Jesus Christ. Both had been sinners who were selected by Jesus for very special missions: St. Peter was to be the first Pope and the rock upon which Jesus built His Church; St. Paul was to be the Apostle to the Gentiles. Both Apostles knew that Jesus spared nothing in His love for them and all men, and they also felt compelled to give themselves for their brethren in the Church. Both were martyrs for the faith, and both spoke boldly for Christ as they knew that they had to obey God rather than men. We should imitate these holy Apostles in their zeal for the faith, and then we will rejoice with them and account the sufferings of this life as nothing in comparison to the great reward promised those who love and serve God. St. Paul knew of this reward and said: “Eye has not seen, or ear heard, nor has it entered the mind of man what God has prepared for those who love him.”


Feast of the Sacred Heart of Jesus
27 June 2014

This Friday is the feast of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. June is the month of the Sacred Heart. Let us honour Jesus’ Sacred Heart by going offering up Holy Mass and Communion in reparation for the sins of the world.

Mission of the Immaculate Mediatrix(MIM)
5 July 2014

On the First Saturday of every month, we will have our monthly formation program for those interested in affiliating themselves with the Marian Spirituality of the Franciscan Friars of the Immaculate. The day begins at 9:30 AM and goes until 4 PM and includes two conferences, Holy Mass, adoration and the rosary. (see flyer on door)
This spirituality is Marian and Franciscan and includes the teachings of St. Francis of Assisi, St. Maximilian Kolbe and other Franciscan saints. “The fundamental aim of the MIM is the fulfilment of God’s plan for the salvation and sanctification of all souls through the maternal mediation of the Immaculate to the supreme glory of the Most Holy Trinity.” (Article 2: Statute)
It is most important at this time in our world to come together and learn about Our Lady and her messages especially Fatima. Pope John Paul II: On November 9, 1976 said in the USA as Karol Cardinal Wojtyla: “We are now standing in face of the greatest historical confrontation humanity has gone through. I do not think that the wide circles of American society or the wide circles of the Christian community realize this fully. We are now facing the final confrontation between the Church and the Anti-Church, of the Gospel versus the anti-gospel.”
We hope that all of you will consider joining the MIM and work for your own sanctification and the sanctification of so many souls who are in danger of being lost for all eternity in hell as Our Lady said at Fatima.

Mission of the Immaculate Mediatrix
First Saturday Day: 5 July 2014
9:30 AM Tea and coffee: St. Joseph’s Hall)
10:00 AM- First Conference: “
11:30 AM- Holy Mass in the chapel
12:30 PM- Lunch (Bring your own); Tea supplied
1:30 PM- Quiet Time: Adoration, Confession, Rosary & Divine Mercy Chaplet
3:00 PM- Benediction
3:15 PM- Second Conference:
4:00-4:30 PM- Tea and Departure


The First Saturday of the Month
5 July 2014
Our Lady told Sr. Lucia in 1925 “…I promise to assist at the hour of death, with all the graces necessary for salvation, all those who, on the first Saturday of five consecutive months go to confession and receive Holy Communion, recite five decades of the Rosary and keep me company for a quarter of an hour while meditating on the mysteries of the Rosary, with the intention of making reparation to me." If only we would do what Our Lady asks, we would be assured of eternal salvation. Our Lady promises us all the graces necessary for our salvation if we keep The Five First Saturdays! Just think that when you are about to die that the Blessed Virgin Mary will be there with you to help you get to heaven! “Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen” How many times have you said these words in your lifetime?

The First Friday, 4 July 2014
Now is a good time to continue (or begin) the devotion to the “Nine First Fridays” of the Month. The Sacred Heart of Jesus promised to St. Margaret Mary: "I promise thee in the excessive mercy of My Heart that My all-powerful love will grant to all those who communicate on the First Friday in nine consecutive months, the grace of final penitence; they shall not die in My disgrace nor without receiving the Sacraments; My Divine heart shall be their safe refuge in this last moment." There is no better way to honour the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus than doing the “Nine First Fridays” every month.






Sunday, June 22, 2014

Second Sunday after Penetecost 22nd June 2014

Dear Friends, Please this week’s bulletin. Let us renew our faith in the Holy Eucharist and promise to visit Our Lord frequently so that the Lord will remember us when we meet Him at our death. Recall an old traditional teaching on visiting Catholic Churches: “Whenever I pass a church, I always make a visit,So that the Lord won’t say (to me), ‘Who is it?’” Ave Maria, Fr. George

Monday, June 16, 2014

Solemnity of The Most Holy Trinity Sunday, 15 June 2014

Solemnity of The Most Holy Trinity Sunday, 15 June 2014

“O the depths of the riches, of the wisdom and of the knowledge of God. How incomprehensible are his judgments and how unsearchable his ways!” Rom. 11:33
The mystery of The Blessed Trinity is the greatest of all mysteries in the Catholic Faith. Man’s finite mind can only try to understand it. St. Augustine tried and one day while contemplating the Blessed Trinity at the seashore, he saw a little boy filling his pail with water from the sea and putting it into a hole in the sand. He asked the boy what he was doing, and the boy replied that he was going to empty the sea into the hole in the sand. St. Augustine told him that this was not possible as the sea was so too big and the hole too small. The boy, an angel in disguise, said, “So, too, you can not understand the Trinity with your finite mind.” Even in heaven, when we see God “face to face” for all eternity, we shall never be able to understand the depths of this sublime mystery. We can only adore it! “O the depths of the riches, of the wisdom and of the knowledge of God. How incomprehensible are his judgments and how unsearchable his ways!” Rom. 11:33

“For from him and through him and unto him are all things. To him be glory forever.” Rom. 11:36
Msgr. Patrick Boylan in his book, The Sunday Gospels and Epistles Vol. I and II comments on the greatness of God: “The abundance of the wealth of God’s grace, of His wisdom, and of His knowledge is beyond all human capacity to estimate.” Boylan, p. 81 St. Paul in today’s Epistle to the Romans (11: 33-6) says: “For from him and through him and unto him are all things. To him be glory forever.” Rom. 11:36 Msgr. Boylan commenting on this verse says: “There is, then nothing of all that is which does not owe its being to the power and wisdom and goodness of God—nothing that is not ‘from Him.’ Everything that is maintained in being by God—is ‘through Him.’ Since, then, every creature is in every way dependent on God, the true goal of all must be God alone (‘unto Him’). The creature that realizes this will also see that all praise and glory belong to God alone forever.” Boylan, p. 82 St. Augustine would remind us that we owe everything to God: “Give to us according to Thy promise for we have done as thou has commanded, it is still true that our doing of the things commanded was God’s doing, since He helped us to do it.” All that we can do is to admire the depths of God’s wisdom and power and to order to Him everything that happens in this world: “… To him be glory forever.” Rom. 11:36

“How incomprehensible are his judgments and how unsearchable his ways!” Rom. 11:33
Msgr. Boylan comments on the meaning of today’s epistle: “The obvious lesson in to-day’s Epistle is the marvelous wisdom of God’s ways, and the folly of questioning them. As the Apostle sees the gracious mercy of God at work in all the devious paths of Hebrew history, so we should seek to find grace and mercy and loving thoughtfulness at work in every phase of our lives. Even when the pattern of mercy is but vaguely – or even not at all discernible in the tangle of our troubles and failures, we should remember that behind all, and deftly guiding all, there is a depth of unfathomable grace and wisdom and knowledge. Day after day, we see bitterness turned into joy, and failure into success; and out of apparent hopelessness we constantly see, against all our forecasts, firm ground of hope arising.
“Murmuring at our lot, loss of courage, lack of trust in God’s mercy—these are so many questionings of the grace and wisdom and knowledge of God, our Father—from Whom, through Whom, and unto Whom are all things, ourselves included, and all that our lives contain.” Boylan, p. 83

Knowledge of the Blessed Trinity
The Holy Spirit used veiled language in the Old Testament when speaking about the Blessed Trinity to avoid confusion with the other nations which had many gods. Only with the coming of the Son of God, Jesus Christ, do we find explicit teachings on the Blessed Trinity. Dom Prosper Gueranger in The Liturgical Year, Vol. 10 comments: “The world had to wait for the fullness of time to be completed; and then God would send into this world His only Son, begotten of Him from all eternity. This His most merciful purpose has been carried out, and ‘the Word made Flesh hath dwelt among us’ (Jn. 1:14) By seeing His glory, the glory of the only-begotten Son of the Father, we have come to know, in God, there is Father and Son. The Son’s mission to our earth, by the very revelation it gave us of Himself, taught us that God is eternally Father, for whatever is in God is eternal. …So that, we now know the Father, from whom comes, as the apostle tells us, all paternity, even on earth (cf. Eph. 3:15). We know Him not only as the creative power, which has produced every being outside Himself; but, guided as it is by faith, our soul’s eye respectfully penetrates into the very essence of the Godhead, and there beholds the Father begetting a Son like unto Himself. But, in order to teach us the mystery, that Son came down upon earth. He Himself has told us expressly that no one knoweth the Father, but the Son, and he to whom it shall please the Son to reveal Him (cf. Mt. 11:27). Gueranger, The Liturgical Year, Vol. 10, p. 97

“…in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost...” Mt. 28:19
“….The intimate knowledge of God has come to us by the Son, whom the Father, in His love, has given to us. (Cf. Jn. 3:16). And this Son of God, who, in order to raise up our minds even to His own divine Nature has clad Himself, by His Incarnation, with our human nature, has taught us that He and His Father are one; that they are one and the same Essence, in distinction of Persons. One begets, the Other is begotten; the One is named Power; the Other, Wisdom, or Intelligence…but, both the One and the Other produce a third Term.
“The Son, who had been sent by the Father, had ascended into heaven, with the human Nature which He had united to Himself for all future eternity; and lo! the Father and the Son send into this world the Spirit who proceeds from them both. It was the Gift, and it taught man that the Lord God was in three Persons. The Spirit, the eternal link of the first two, is Will, He is Love, in the divine Essence. In God, then, is the fullness of Being, without beginning, without succession, without increase; for there is nothing which He has not. In these three eternal Terms of His uncreated Substance, is the Act, pure and infinite.” Gueranger, p.98

“Faith seeking understanding”

With the mystery of the Blessed Trinity, all that we can do is believe and have faith as St. Anselm tells us, “Faith seeking understanding.” First, we have faith and belief, and then we will begin to understand, even a little, this great mystery of the Blessed Trinity which we will contemplate for all eternity in heaven. How blessed we are, as today’s Gospel (Mt. 28:18-20) reminds us, that we are children of God by our baptism in the name of the Blessed Trinity: “Going therefore, teach ye all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost...” Mt. 28:1

Corpus Christ Processions

“The sacrament of charity, the Holy Eucharist, is the gift that Jesus Christ makes of himself, thus revealing to us God’s infinite love for every man and woman. This wondrous sacrament makes manifest that greater love which led him to ‘lay down his life for his friends.’ “(Jn. 15:13)

Cornwall Deanery
Lemon Quay, Truro
Sunday, 15 June 2014
3:00 PM

Lanherne Convent
Chapel of St. Joseph and St Anne
St. Mawgan- Newquay
Thursday, 19 June 2014
2:00 PM Adoration
3:00 PM Procession with Benediction at three stations

Tea in St. Joseph’s Hall
after Procession

A Day With Mary
Buckfast Abbey
Saturday 21th June 2014



9




Sunday, June 8, 2014

Pentecost Sunday 8th June 2014

Pentecost Sunday,
8 June 2014

“And I will ask the Father and he will give you another Advocate to dwell with you forever...” Jn. 14:16
Today, we rejoice in the Solemnity of Pentecost, which along with Christmas and Easter, is one of the three great events in the liturgical year. Dom Prosper Gueranger in his The Liturgical Year Vol. 9 comments: “Four great events mark the sojourn of man on earth; and each of them is a proof of God’s infinite goodness towards us. The first is the creation of man and his vocation to a supernatural state, which gives him, as his last end, the eternal vision and possession of God. The second is the Incarnation of the divine Word, who, by uniting the human to the divine Nature, raises a created being to a participation of the Divinity, and, at the same time, provides the Victim needed for redeeming Adam and his race from the state of perdition into which they fell by sin. The third event is that which we celebrate today, the descent of the Holy Ghost, when He will free His bride, the Church, from the shackles of mortality, and lead her to heaven, there to celebrate His eternal nuptials with her. In these four divine acts, the last of which has not yet been accomplished, is included the whole history of mankind; all other events bear, more or less, upon them.” Gueranger, p. 303-4

Pentecost and the Paschal Mystery
Dom Gueranger explains how important the mystery of Pentecost is in relation to the Paschal solemnity: “The Pasch is the redemption of man by the victory of Christ; Pentecost is the Holy Ghost taking possession of man redeemed. The Ascension is the intermediate mystery; it consummates the Pasch, by placing the Man-God, the Conqueror of death, and our head, at the right hand of the Father; it prepares the mission of the Holy Ghost to our earth. This mission could not take place until Jesus had been glorified, as St. John tells us (cf. Jn. 7:39 “...for the Spirit had not yet been given, since Jesus had not yet been glorified.”); ...This divine mission was not to be given to the Third Person until men were deprived of the visible presence of Jesus. As we have already said, the hearts of the faithful were henceforward to follow their absent Redeemer by a purer and wholly spiritual love. Now who was to bring us this new love, if not He who is the link of the eternal love of the Father and the Son? This Holy Spirit of love and union is called, in the sacred Scriptures, the ‘Gift of God’; and it is on the day of Pentecost that the Father and the Son send us this ineffable Gift. Let us call to mind the words spoken by our Emmanuel to the Samaritan woman at the well at Sichar: ‘If thou didst know the Gift of God!’ Jn 4: 10. We know the Gift of God; so that we have but to open our hearts to receive Him as did the three thousand who listened to St. Peter’s sermon.” Gueranger, p. 291-3

Old Pentecost and New Pentecost
The descent of the Holy Ghost at Pentecost is foreshadowed in the Old Testament promulgation of the Ten Commandments on Mt. Sinai fifty days after the Jews had crossed the Red Sea. Dom Gueranger comments on the interrelationship of the two Pentecosts: “The Pentecost (fiftieth day) was honoured by the promulgation of the ten commandments of the divine law; and every following year, the Israelites celebrated the great event by a solemn festival. But their Pentecost was figurative, like their Pasch; there was to be a second Pentecost for all people, as there was to be a second Pasch, for the Redemption of the whole world. The Pasch, with all its triumphant joys, belongs to the Son of God, the Conqueror of death; Pentecost belongs to the Holy Ghost, for it is the day whereon He began His mission into this world, which, henceforward, was to be under His Law.... In this second Pentecost, ...repentance and gratitude are the sentiments now uppermost. A divine fire burns within their souls, and will spread throughout the whole world....” Gueranger., p. 277-8

Second Pentecost
Dom Gueranger again explains the intense spiritual awakening that occurs on the Jewish feast of Pentecost: “Jerusalem is filled with pilgrims, who have flocked thither from every country of the Gentile world. ...they have come to keep the feasts of Pasch and Pentecost. ...Amidst these Jews properly so called, are to be seen many Gentiles... This influx of strangers, who have come to Jerusalem out of a desire to observe the Law, gives the city a Babel-like appearance for each nation has its own language. They are not under the influence of pride and prejudice, as are the inhabitants of Judea; neither have they, like these latter, known and rejected the Messias, nor blasphemed His works.... so now, at this hour of Tierce (9:00 AM), the Father and the Son send upon earth the holy Spirit who proceeds from them both. He is sent to form the Church, the bride and the kingdom of Christ; He is to assist and maintain her; He is to save and sanctify the souls of men; and this His mission is to continue to the end of time.
“Suddenly is heard, coming from heaven, sound of a violent wind; it startles the people in the city, it fills the cenacle with its mighty breath. A crowd is soon round the house that stands on Mount Sion; the hundred and twenty disciples that are within the building feel the mysterious emotion within them, of which their Master once said: ‘The Spirit breatheth where He will, and thou hearest his voice’. Jn. 3:8 ...A silent shower falls in the house; it is a shower of fire which, as holy Church says ‘burns not but enlightens, consumes not but shines.’ (Responsory for Thursday within the Octave) Flakes of fire, in the shape of tongues, rest on the heads of the hundred and twenty disciples; it is the Holy Ghost taking possession of all and each. The Church is now not only in Mary, but also in these hundred and twenty disciples. All belong now to the Spirit that has descended upon them; His kingdom is begun, it is manifested, its conquests will be speedy and glorious.” Gueranger,. 278-280

Speaking in all tongues
Dom Gueranger highlights the great miracle of tongues for all to believe: “Since the confusion of Babel, there have been so many languages; ...How, then, is the word to become the instrument of the world’s conquest, and to make one family out of all these nations that cannot understand each other? ...With other gifts, wherewith He has enriched the hundred and twenty disciples, He has given them understanding in every language. In a transport of holy enthusiasm, they attempt to speak the languages of all nations; their tongue and their ear take in, not only without effort, but with charm and joy, this plentitude of word and speech which is to reunite mankind together. The Spirit of love has annulled the separation of Babel; men are once more made brethren by the unity of language... What is the surprise of this multitude, composed as it is of people of so many different nations, when these poor uneducated Galileans address them, each in the language of his country? ...The Holy Spirit makes His presence and influence to be felt in the hearts of these favoured listeners A few moments previously they were disciples of Sinai, who come from distant lands to celebrate the by-gone Pasch and Pentecost; now they have faith, simple and full faith, in Christ. They repent of the awful crime of His death, of which they have been accomplices; they confess His Resurrection and Ascension...These children of Israel had to make the sacrifice, or they never could have shared in the graces of the new Pentecost: ...three thousand declared themselves disciples of Christ, and received the mark of adoption in holy Baptism. ...To-morrow, Peter is to preach in the temple, and five thousand men will enrol themselves as disciples of Jesus of Nazareth. Hail! Then, dear creation of the Holy Ghost! Militant on earth; triumphant in heaven; beautiful, noble, immortal Church, all hail! And thou, bright Pentecost! Day of our truest birth! How fair, how glorious, thou makest these first hours of Jesus’ bride on earth! The divine Spirit thou givest us, has written, not on upon stone, but upon our hearts, the Law that is to govern us.” Gueranger, p. 281, 287, 289- 291.


Corpus Christ Processions

“The sacrament of charity, the Holy Eucharist, is the gift that Jesus Christ makes of himself, thus revealing to us God’s infinite love for every man and woman. This wondrous sacrament makes manifest that greater love which led him to ‘lay down his life for his friends.’ “(Jn. 15:13)

Cornwall Deanery
Lemon Quay, Truro
Sunday, 15 June 2014
3:00 PM

Lanherne Convent
Chapel of St. Joseph and St Anne
St. Mawgan- Newquay
Thursday, 19 June 2014
2:00 PM Adoration
3:00 PM Procession with Benediction at three stations

Tea in St. Joseph’s Hall
after Procession


A Day With Mary
Buckfast Abbey
Saturday 21th June 2014



Wednesday, June 4, 2014

Ascension Sunday, 1 June 2014

“Men of Galilee, why do you stand looking up to heaven? This Jesus who has been taken up from you into heaven shall come in the same way as you have seen Him going up to heaven.” Acts 1:11

As we celebrate the Solemnity of the Ascension today, we must raise our thoughts to heaven where Our Lord Jesus has ascended. Pope St. Leo the Great said: “Christ’s Ascension is our ascension; our body has the hope of one day being where its glorious Head has preceded it.” This is what Jesus said on the night before He died: “I go to prepare a place for you, and if I shall go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and will take you to myself; that where I am you also may be.” Jn. 14: 23. According to Fr. Gabriel, OCD in his book of meditations, Divine Intimacy, “The Ascension is then, a feast of joyful hope, a sweet foretaste of heaven. By going before us, Jesus our Head has given us the right to follow Him there some day, and we can even say with St. Leo, ‘In the person of Christ, we have penetrated the heights of heaven.’ (Roman Breviary) As in Christ Crucified, we die to sin; as in the Risen Christ, we rise to the life of grace, so too, we are raised up to heaven in the Ascension of Christ. This vital participation in Christ’s mysteries is the essential consequence of our incorporation in Him. He is our Head; we, as His members, are totally dependent upon him and intimately bound to His destiny. ‘God, who is rich in mercy,’ says St. Paul, ‘for His exceeding charity wherewith He loved us...hath quickened us together in Christ... and hast raised us up... and hath made us sit together in the heavenly place through Christ Jesus.’ Eph. 2:4-6 Our right to heaven has been given us, our place is ready; it is for us to live in such a way that we may occupy it someday.” Fr. Gabriel, “Divine Intimacy,” p. 535

“...ascending on high, He hath led captivity captive.” Ps. 67:19

In today’s Mass, the Alleluia verses give us a powerful prophecy of the Messias leading souls into heaven: “Alleluia. The Lord is in Sinai, in the holy place; ascending on high, He hath led captivity captive.” Ps. 67:19 This image of captives being led into the city of their conquerors was common in Rome when victorious generals would lead their conquests, as their trophies, into the imperial city. So, too, Jesus will lead those whom He has redeemed into heaven as Dom Prosper Gueranger in The Liturgical Year, Vol.9 explains: “The two Alleluia-versicles give us the words of the royal psalmist, wherein he celebrates the glorious Ascension of the future Messias, the acclamation of the angels, the loud music of heaven’s trumpets, the gorgeous pageant of the countless fortunate captives of limbo whom the conqueror leads up, as His trophy, to heaven.” Gueranger, p. 179. How blessed shall we be who are led into heaven as trophies of Christ’s glorious redemption.

“Sweet Sorrow of Christ’s Ascension”
Although Jesus’ Ascension into Heaven has an element of sorrow, Jesus told us that our “sorrow will be turned to joy.” (Jn. 16:20) We can see this especially if we look at Jesus’ Ascension through the eyes of His beloved Mother Mary. The disciples of Jesus used to wonder which of the two sentiments, sadness or joy, had priority in Our Lady’s heart when Jesus ascended into heaven. Dom Prosper Gueranger comments on this question: “They (disciples) used to ask themselves, which of the two sentiments was uppermost in her maternal heart, --sadness, that she was to see her Jesus no more, or joy, that He was now going to enter into the glory He so infinitely deserved. The answer was soon found: had not Jesus said to His disciples: ‘If ye loved Me, ye would indeed be glad, because I go to the Father’; Jn. 14:28 Now, who loved Jesus as Mary did? The Mother’s heart, then, was full of joy at parting with Him. How was she to think of herself, when there was question of the triumph of her Son and her God? Could she that had witnessed the scene of Calvary, do less than desire to see Him glorified, whom she knew to be the sovereign Lord of all things, -- Him whom, but a short time ago, she had seen rejected by His people, blasphemed, and dying the most ignominious and cruel of deaths?” Gueranger, p. 170

“Sorrow to turn to joy!”
“Amen, Amen I say to you that your shall weep and lament, but the world shall rejoice; and you shall be sorrowful but your sorrow shall be turned to joy.” Jn. 16:20
But before our sorrow turns to joy in heaven with Jesus’ return, the angels remind the disciples that they must not stand idle. They are to return to Jerusalem and await the Holy Spirit. Then the disciples are instructed to go into the whole world and baptize all in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit: “Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you: and behold I am with you all days, even to consummation of the world.” Mt. 28:19-20 Jesus gave His disciples this commission just before He ascended into heaven. Dom Gueranger tells us that the disciples were still caught up in the moment of Jesus’ Ascension: “The disciples are still steadfastly looking up to towards heaven, when lo! two angels, clad in white robes, appear to them saying: ‘Ye men of Galilee! Why stand ye looking up to heaven? This Jesus, who is taken up from you into heaven, shall so come as ye have seen Him going into heaven!’ Acts 1:10-11

Joy and Triumph in the Ascension
Dom Gueranger again reminds us of the meaning of Jesus’ Ascension: “He has ascended, a Saviour; He is to return a Judge: between these two events is comprised the whole life of the Church on earth. We are therefore living under the reign of Jesus as our Saviour, for He has said: ‘God sent not His Son into the world to judge the world, but that the world might be saved by Him:’ (Jn. 3:17) and to carry out this merciful design He has been giving to His disciples the mission to go throughout the whole world, and invite men, while yet there is time, to accept the mystery of salvation. .... They love Jesus; they rejoice at the thought of His having entered into His rest. ‘They went back into Jerusalem with great joy.’ Lk. 24:52 These few simple words of the Gospel indicate the spirit of this admirable feast of the Ascension: it is a festival which, not withstanding its soft tinge of sadness, is, more than any other expressive of joy and triumph.” Gueranger, p. 173-4

The Need for Prayer

Our Holy Father, St. John Paul II spoke of the absolute need of prayer in our lives if we wish to gain eternal salvation: “…we must pray too because we are fragile and culpable. We need to admit humbly and truly that we are poor creatures, with confused ideas…We are fragile and weak, and in constant need of interior strength and consolation. Prayer gives us strength for great ideals, for keeping up our faith, charity, purity, generosity; prayer gives us strength to rise up from indifference and guilt, if we have had the misfortune to give in to temptation and weakness. Prayer gives light by which to see and to judge from God’s perspective and from eternity. That is why you must not give up praying! Don’t let a day go by without praying a little! Prayer is a duty, but it is also a joy because it is a dialogue with God through Jesus Christ.” Servant of God, Pope John Paul II, Audience with Young People, 14 March 1979 If we want to save our souls, then we must pray for the graces that we need. This is why Our Lady told the three children at Fatima: “Pray and sacrifice, for many souls will go to hell because no one prays and sacrifices for them.”

First Friday: 6 June 2014
Now is a good time to continue (or begin) the devotion to the “Nine First Fridays” of the Month. The Sacred Heart of Jesus promised to St. Margaret Mary: "I promise thee in the excessive mercy of My Heart that My all-powerful love will grant to all those who communicate on the First Friday in nine consecutive months, the grace of final penitence; they shall not die in My disgrace nor without receiving the Sacraments; My Divine heart shall be their safe refuge in this last moment."

Mission of the Immaculate Mediatrix
(MIM) 7June 2014

On the First Saturday of every month, we will have our monthly formation program for those who interested in affiliating themselves with the Marian Spirituality of the Franciscan Friars of the Immaculate. The day begins at 9:30 AM and goes until 4 PM and includes two conferences, Holy Mass, adoration and the rosary. (see flyer on door)
This spirituality is Marian and Franciscan and includes the teachings of St. Francis of Assisi, St. Maximilian Kolbe and other Franciscan saints. “The fundamental aim of the MIM is the fulfilment of God’s plan for the salvation and sanctification of all souls through the maternal mediation of the Immaculate to the supreme glory of the Most Holy Trinity.” (Article 2: Statute)
It is most important at this time in our world to come together and learn about Our Lady and her messages especially Fatima. Pope John Paul II: On November 9, 1976 said in the USA as Karol Cardinal Wojtyla: “We are now standing in face of the greatest historical confrontation humanity has gone through. I do not think that the wide circles of American society or the wide circles of the Christian community realize this fully. We are now facing the final confrontation between the Church and the Anti-Church, of the Gospel versus the anti-gospel.”
We hope that all of you will consider joining the MIM and work for your own sanctification and the sanctification of so many souls who are in danger of being lost for all eternity in hell as Our Lady said at Fatima.


The First Saturday: 7 June 2014
Our Lady told Sr. Lucia in 1925 “…I promise to assist at the hour of death, with all the graces necessary for salvation, all those who, on the first Saturday of five consecutive months go to confession and receive Holy Communion, recite five decades of the Rosary and keep me company for a quarter of an hour while meditating on the mysteries of the Rosary, with the intention of making reparation to me." If only we would do what Our Lady asks, we would be assured of eternal salvation. Our Lady promises us all the graces necessary for our salvation if we keep The Five First Saturdays!









Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Fifth Sunday after Easter 25th May 2014

Fifth Sunday After Easter
25 May 2014

“Amen, amen, I say to you if you ask the Father anything in my name, he will give it to you.” Jn. 16:23
Today’s liturgy again, as in the past Sundays after Easter, prepares us for Jesus’ Ascension, when He will leave His Apostles, and for Pentecost, when He will send them the Holy Spirit who will enlighten and strengthen them. Jesus also wants to console them for His absence by promising them that they can ask the Father anything “in His Name” and they will receive it: “Amen, amen, I say to you if you ask the Father anything in my name, he will give it to you.” Jn. 16:23 This is truly a consoling promise to the Apostles who were so forlorn with Jesus’ words of departure. They no longer have to fear being alone as He will always be there for them with the Father. Jesus’ promise of asking the Father for help in His Name in today’s Gospel (Jn. 16:23-30) and the teaching of today’s Epistle from St. James (1:22-27) provides us with a solid teaching on efficacious prayer. If we pray, as Jesus taught His Apostles, then we have absolute confidence that we will be heard. All we need to do is to pray “in the Name of Jesus” with a good conscience, with humility and with confidence.

Ask “in the Name of Jesus”

When we pray “in the Name of Jesus,” our prayers and our good works obtain a superabundant value as they are founded on the infinite merits of Jesus Christ. We must remember that we are unprofitable servants (cf. Lk. 17:10) who can do nothing (cf. Jn. 15:5) of ourselves and that our sufficiency comes from Jesus Crucified. “Consequently,” according to Fr. Gabriel in Divine Intimacy, “the first condition of prayer made ‘in the name of Jesus’ is humility, an ever deeper and more realistic sense of our nothingness. It must be complemented by the second condition, a boundless confidence in the merits of Jesus, which surpass all our poverty, misery, necessities and needs. In view of Jesus’ infinite merits, we can never ask too much in His Name: we can never be too bold in imploring the plenitude of divine grace for our souls, in aspiring to that sanctity which is hidden, but genuine. ...Moreover, there is no creature of good will, no matter how weak and insignificant, who, ‘in the Name of Jesus,’ cannot aspire to sanctity.” Fr. Gabriel, p. 524

“Be ye doers of the word
and not hearers only.” Ja. 1:22

“However, in order to make our prayer effective, a third condition is required: our life must correspond to our prayer, our faith must be translated into good works. ‘Be ye doers of the word and not hearers only, deceiving your own selves. For if a man be a hearer of the word and not a doer, he shall be compared to a man beholding his own countenance in a glass. For he beheld himself, and went his way, and presently forgot what manner of man he was.’ Ja. 1:22 This strong exhortation of St. James, which is found in today’s Epistle is an urgent reminder of the practical character of the Christian life. Vain is our prayer, vain our confidence in God, if we do not add our generous efforts to perform all our duties, to live up to our high vocation. We can add, and we should, hope for everything in the ‘Name of Jesus,’ but He expects a constant effort on our part to be entirely faithful to Him.” Fr. Gabriel, p. 524-5.

“...through our Lord Jesus Christ.”

Cornelius a Lapide in his Commentary on the Gospel of St. John, also reminds us why it is so important to pray genuinely “in the Name of Jesus”: “...To ask in the name of Christ is to ask through Christ, or through Christ’s merits, dignity, and authority. For Christ, by His passion and death, merited that we should obtain from God whatever we ask in His name. Therefore this obtaining, with respect to us, is grace, and with respect to Christ is but justice. ‘His name’ signifies in Scripture His strength, virtue, merits, grace, dignity and authority. Therefore to ask in the name of Christ, is to ask while counting on His merits, and to trust in them, not in our own; that God may look, not on our unworthiness and our sins, but upon the face of His anointed, and on account of His sanctity and merits grant us that which we do not deserve. Christ therefore points here not merely to God, but to God incarnate, and obedient even unto the death of the cross. For He merited, that the Father should hear our prayers. This is the Church’s interpretation, for she ends all her prayers ‘through our Lord Jesus Christ.’ Thus the Jews used to pray through the merits of their fathers, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. But we Christians pray through the merits of Christ, who infinitely surpasses their merits.” a Lapide, p . 660.

For the good of our salvation
Since Jesus promised us that the Father would answer all our prayers, if we pray in His Name, we might ask why then are our prayers not answered as we wish? Cornelius a Lapide answers this observation: “Again, to ask in the name of Christ, is to ask those things which He wishes and desires to be given us, those namely which concern the salvation of the soul. Hence such a prayer is effectual, and is heard by God....The reason they obtain not, is because they ask not the things which they ought, not in the way they ought....It requires contrition for sin, so that he who prays may be, or may heartily wish to become, a friend of God. Sinners therefore, wilfully persisting in sin, are not heard by God.... It requires great faith and hope, or confidence, that we shall obtain what we ask for through the merits of Christ. This confidence many have not, and therefore they obtain not... Lastly, St. Augustine rightly observes, ‘God occasionally refuses what we ask for, because this is more expedient for our salvation and His glory. God therefore hears us, not according to our wishes, but according to our salvation.’” a Lapide, p. 660-1

The Need for Prayer

Our Holy Father, Bl. John Paul II, spoke of the absolute need for prayer in our lives: “… we must pray too because we are fragile and culpable. We need to admit humbly and truly that we are poor creatures, with confused ideas…We are fragile and weak, and in constant need of interior strength and consolation. Prayer gives us strength for great ideals, for keeping up our faith, charity, purity, generosity; prayer gives us strength to rise up from indifference and guilt, if we have had the misfortune to give into temptation and weakness. Prayer gives light by which to see and to judge from God’s perspective and from eternity. That is why you must not give up praying! Don’t let a day go by without praying a little! Prayer is a duty, but it is also a joy because it is a dialogue with God through Jesus Christ.” (St. John Paul II, Audience with Young People, 14 March 1979)

Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament

“Could you not, then, watch one hour with Me?” Mt. 26:40


From “HOLY FATHER'S PASTORAL LETTER TO THE CATHOLICS OF IRELAND” (3 March 2010) “.... Particular attention should also be given to Eucharistic adoration, and in every diocese there should be churches or chapels specifically devoted to this purpose. I ask parishes, seminaries, religious houses and monasteries to organise periods of Eucharistic adoration, so that all have an opportunity to take part. Through intense prayer before the real presence of the Lord, you can make reparation for the sins of abuse that have done so much harm, at the same time imploring the grace of renewed strength and a deeper sense of mission on the part of all bishops, priests, religious and lay faithful.” (No. 14) We are now in our forty-eighth week of Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament from after Mass until Benediction at 3:10 P. M. every day.

May is the Month of Mary:

Our beloved Holy Father St.. John Paul II spoke of the importance devotion to Our Lady and the Family Rosary: “The Christian family finds and consolidates its identity in prayer. Make the daily effort to find a time to pray together, to talk with Our Lord and listen to his voice. How beautiful it is when the family prays in the evening, even though it be only a part of the Rosary. The family that prays together stays together; a family that prays is a family that is saved. Act in such a way that your home may be a place of Christian faith and virtue through your praying together.” (Address to families, 24 March 1984)

May Crowning and Consecration

Today, 25 May 2014, we will have a May Crowning of Our Lady and a Consecration to the Immaculate (according to St. Maximilian Kolbe) at our Lourdes Grotto after Mass. This is a most important devotion as it honours Our Holy Mother during her special Month of May, and it binds us to her as her special “possession and property.” St. Maximilian Kolbe spoke of all those who are consecrated to the Immaculate “She penetrates our soul and directs its faculties with unlimited power. We truly belong to Her. Therefore, we are with Her always and everywhere...”(SK 461)
And further still: “We are Hers, of the Immaculate, unlimitedly Hers, perfectly Hers, we are, as it were, Her very self. She, by means of us, loves the good God. She, with our poor heart, loves Her divine Son. We become the means by which the Immaculate loves Jesus, and Jesus, seeing that we are Her property, a part, as it were, of His most loving Mother, loves Her in and through us. What beautiful mysteries!” Sk 508
St. Maximilian declared that those who are consecrated to the Immaculate would be a means of holiness and grace to others (especially their own family): “She needs to be brought into all hearts,’ so that She, upon entering into these hearts, may give birth there to the sweet Jesus, to God, and bring Him up even to that perfect age. What a beautiful mission!” SK508

St. Louis de Montfort tells us of Total Consecration to Mary: “This devotion consists, therefore, in giving ourselves entirely to the Most Blessed Virgin that, through her we may belong entirely to Jesus Christ. We must give her: (1) our body with all its senses and members; (2) our soul with its powers; (3) our material possessions and all that we may acquire; (4) our interior and spiritual possessions—our merits, our virtues and our good works, past, present, and future; in short, all that we possess in the order of nature, in the order of grace …” St. Louis de Montfort, True Devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary, p. 88-9