Monday, November 16, 2015

(25th Sunday after Pentecost) Sixth Sunday after Epiphany, 15 November 2015


Sixth Sunday after Epiphany

(25th Sunday after Pentecost)

15 November 2015

(Epistle & Gospel, of 6th Sunday after Epiphany)

 

“I will open my mouth in parables; things hidden since the world was made I will announce.”  Mt. 13:35

In today’s readings, we have the fulfilment of the gospel parables, The Mustard Seed and The Leaven, found in the Epistle of St. Paul to the Thessalonians (1:2-10).  St. Paul praises the faith of the Thessalonians:“And you became imitators of us and of the Lord, receiving the word in great tribulation with joy in the Holy Spirit, so that you became a pattern for all believers in Macedonia and in Achaia. I Thess. 1:6-7  In the Gospel (Mt,13:31-35), Jesus speaks of The Parable of the Mustard Seed which “is the smallest of all the seeds; but when it grows up it is larger than any herb and becomes a tree, so that the birds of the air come and dwell in its branches.” Mt. 13:32.  Jesus also speaks of The Parable of the Leaven “which a woman took and buried in three measures of flour, until it was all leavened.” Mt. 13:33.  Both parables speak of the Kingdom of God, the Church upon earth, and how it will grow from the Twelve Apostles throughout the whole world and will influence all peoples with the  gospel message.  This fruitful growth of the Church among the pagan people through the preaching of St. Paul is evident in the Epistle to the Thessalonians. For their faithfulness, sacrifice, and good example the Thessalonians became an example to all the other Churches in Greece:  “We thank God always for all of you when we make mention of you in our prayers for we unceasingly remember your active faith, your energetic charity and your unwavering hope in our Lord Jesus Christ before the face of God, our Father.”  I Thess. 1:2-3.

 

The Parable of the Mustard Seed

Although it is the smallest of seeds the mustard seed grows into a tree so large that the birds of the air dwell in its branches.  So, too, the Church Jesus founded upon the Twelve Apostles would grow until it encompassed almost all of the  known world at that time. Similarly, within three centuries the Church would be established throughout the entire Roman Empire. St. Augustine comments on the spiritual significance of the mustard seed: “At first glance it seems small, worthless, despised, not marked by any flavour, not surrounded by any   odour, nor giving any sign of sweetness; but  once it is bruised, it sheds abroad  its odour, displays its sharpness  and exhales nourishment of a fiery taste. ...Thus, too, the Christian Faith, at first sight, appears small, worthless and frail, not manifesting its power, nor carrying any semblance of pride, nor conferring grace. But as soon as it begins to be bruised by divers temptations, immediately it manifests its vigour, indicates its sharpness, breathes the warmth of belief in the Lord, and is possessed with so great ardour  of divine fire, that both itself is hot and it compels those who participate to be fervent also. As the two disciples said in the holy gospel, when the Lord spoke with them after His passion, ‘Did not our hearts burn within us by the way, while the Lord Jesus opened to us the Scriptures.’ (Lk. 24:32) A grain of mustard, then, warms the inward members of our bodies, but the  power of faith burns up the sins of our hearts. The one indeed takes away piercing cold; the other expels the devil’s frost of transgressions. A grain of mustard, I say, purges away corporeal humours, but faith puts an end to the flux of lusts. By the one, medicine is gained for the head; but by faith our spiritual Head, Christ the Lord, is often refreshed. Moreover, we enjoy the sacred odour of faith, according to the analogy of mustard seed, as the blessed Apostle saith, ‘We are a sweet savour of Christ unto God.’’’ (II Cor. 2:15) A Lapide, Commentary on St. Matthew’s Gospel, p. 27

 

The Parable of the Leaven

The Parable of the Leaven flows naturally from The Parable of the Mustard Seed because as the Church grows, so will it influence the whole world just as the leaven (yeast) permeates all the dough.   Interestingly, the three measures of bread is quite large and will feed eighteen people for five days.   Jesus makes it so large to emphasize that the Church will influence the whole world. St. Ambrose also applies this to Christ in a spiritual meaning of the leaven:  “Therefore, if the Lord is wheat (as He Himself says in John 12:24), the Lord is the leaven, too, since leaven is usually made only of wheaten flour. Therefore, the Lord is rightly compared to leaven for when He was in the form of man, made small by humility and despised for His weakness, He contained within Himself such power of wisdom that the world itself could scarcely contain His doctrine. When He began to diffuse Himself throughout the world by virtue of His divinity, He immediately drew the entire human race into His substance by His power so that He might place the yoke of His Holy Spirit upon all of them, that is, make all Christians to be what Christ is....so Christ (like leaven) is broken up and dissolved by His various sufferings, and His moisture, that is, His precious blood, was poured out for our salvation, that it might by mingling  itself with the whole human race, consolidate that race, which lay scattered abroad.”  A Lapide, p. 29-30

 

The Growth of the Church at Thessalonica

After St. Paul was expelled by the Jewish leaders at Philippi, he went to the port city of Thessalonica where he found the inhabitants of that city open to the message of the gospel.  At first, St. Paul went to the Jewish residents of the city, but after a few weeks with little success, he turned to the Gentiles. There he met with so much success that the Jewish leaders brought charges of treason (preaching about another king) against the  Christian missionaries, and St. Paul and his companions had to flee.  While at Athens, St. Paul sent Timothy to learn how the Church at Thessalonica fared during the persecution.  Timothy reported later, when Paul was at Corinth, that the converts were heroic in the practice of the faith: “And you became imitators of us and of the Lord, receiving the word in great tribulation with joy in the Holy Spirit, so that you became a pattern for all believers in Macedonia and in Achaia. From you the word of the Lord has been spread abroad not only in Macedonia and Achaia, but in every place your faith in God has gone forth, so that we need say nothing further.”   I Thess. 1:6-8.  The Thessalonians are a joy to the heart of Paul, as they not only embraced the faith from their pagan ways, but they have even imitated Paul and his companions, Silvanus and Timothy, and spread the faith by their good example throughout the land and the other seaports. 

 

Early Christians a reproach to us today

Dom Gueranger in his book, The Liturgical Life, Vol. 4, tells us how the early Christians are a strong reproach to us to imitate them in their lives:  “The praise which the apostle here gives to  the Thessalonians for their fervour in the faith they had embraced, conveys a reproach to the Christians of our times. These neophytes of Thessalonica, who, a short time before, were worshippers of idols, had become so earnest in the practice of the Christian religion, that even the apostle is filled with admiration. We are the descendants of the countless Christian ancestors; we received our regeneration by Baptism at our first coming into the world; we were taught the doctrine of Jesus Christ from our earliest childhood: yet, our faith is not so strong, nor our lives so holy, as were those of the early Christian.  Their main occupation was serving the living and true God, and waiting for the coming of their Saviour.  Our hope is precisely the same as that which made their hearts so fervent; how comes it that our faith is not like theirs in its generosity?  We love this present life, as though we had no firm conviction that it is to pass away.” Gueranger, p. 102

 

Good Example

The power of good example is the reason why the Thessalonians followed Paul and his companions and why other Greeks followed the example of the Thessalonians.  Despite persecution, they kept the faith and awaited the coming of the Lord.  So, too, should we, as the parables in today’s gospel suggest, try to build up the kingdom of God by our good example and permeate all of society.  This is what Our Lady requested at Fatima when she asked us to pray and sacrifice for the souls of so many in our time who are in danger of being lost for all eternity unless they get a miracle of God’s grace: “Pray and sacrifice for many souls will go to hell, unless someone prays and sacrifices for them.” (Fatima, 1917)

 

November:Remember the Poor Souls in Purgatory


  Let us remember all those who have given their lives during the Two World Wars by recalling the words of this lovely poem.


 


 


“In Flanders Fields”


by John McCrae, May 1915


In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.


We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep,
though poppies grow

In Flanders fields.”

(Twenty-Third Sunday after Pentecost) Fifth Sunday after Epiphany, 8 November 2015


Fifth Sunday after Epiphany

(Twenty-Third Sunday after Pentecost)

8 November  2015

 

“Put ye on therefore, as the elect of God, holy and beloved, the bowels of mercy, benignity, humility, modesty, patience: bearing with one another and forgiving one another...” Col. 3: 12-3

 

Today’s liturgy highlights the importance of charity in an evil and corrupt world.  In the Epistle (Colossians 3:12-17), St. Paul reminds us that “charity is the bond of perfection.” Col. 3:14 If we do not have the virtue of charity, we will not enter the kingdom of heaven.   In the Gospel (Matthew 13: 24-30), Jesus gives us the parable of the “Wheat and the Cockle” to illustrate in simple language a profound teaching about the existence of evil in the world: “The kingdom of heaven is likened to a man that sowed good seed in his field. But while men were asleep, his enemy came and oversowed cockle among the wheat and went his way.” Mt. 3:24   From this brief description, we can see how God created all things good, but the devil sowed evil into the hearts of men to cause them to sin.  When the man who owns the field is asked by his servants if the cockle should be removed, he says, “No, lest perhaps gathering up the cockle, you root up the wheat also together with it.  Suffer both to grow until the harvest, and in time of harvest I will say to the reapers: Gather up first the cockle, and bind it into bundles to burn, but the wheat gather ye into my barn.”  Mt. 13:29-30 )  The meaning of the parable is clear: God will allow both good and evil to co-exist in life for a time, but then He will separate the good from the evil and save the good and destroy the evildoers in the fire of hell. What is most important about this parable is that it gives us several reasons for the existence of evil in the world.  It also shows how God will always bring good out any evil that men do (cf. Catechism of the Catholic Church #311); Christians will have the opportunity to practice charity which is needed to enter the kingdom of heaven and with their good example and prayers, Christians may even convert the wicked (cockle).

 

“Let the word of Christ dwell in you abundantly, in all wisdom: teaching and admonishing one another in psalms, hymns, and spiritual canticles, singing in grace in your hearts.” Col. 3:16

  Dom Prosper Gueranger in his book, The Liturgical Year Vol. 4, comments on the need  for living the Christian life, as St. Paul emphasizes in the Epistle,  as true followers of Jesus Christ.  “The Christian, trained as he has been in the school of the Man-God who deigned to dwell upon this earth, should ever show mercy towards his fellow-men. This world which has been purified by the presence of the Incarnate Word would become an abode of peace, if we were but to live in such manner as to merit the titles, given us by the apostle, of elect of God, holy and beloved. The peace here spoken of should, first of all, fill the heart of every Christian, and give it an uninterrupted joy, which would be ever pouring itself forth in singing the praises of God.  But it is mainly on the Sundays, that the faithful, by taking part with the Church in her psalms, hymns and spiritual canticles, fulfil this duty so dear to their hearts.  Let us, moreover, in our every-day life, practise the advice given us by the apostle, of doing all things in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, in order that we may, in all things, find favour with our heavenly Father.”  Gueranger, p. 95-6  

 

“Charity... the bond of perfection...” Col. 3:14

Fr. Gabriel of St. Magdalen in his book of meditations, Divine Intimacy, reminds us of the practical means in  today’s Epistle for us to show charity amidst human suffering and evil: “The Epistle for this Sunday recalls to our mind the fundamental duty of a Christian: charity.... ‘But above all these things,’ St. Paul recommends, ‘have charity, which is the bond of perfection’ (Col. 3: 14 ); not only love for God, but also for our neighbour. .... ‘Put ye on therefore, as the elect of God, holy and beloved, the bowels of mercy, benignity, humility, modesty, patience: bearing with one another and forgiving one another, if any have a complaint against another.’ (Col. 3: 12-3).... Consider the perfect love which the Apostle asks us to have for our neighbour: mercy, compassion, mutual forgiveness, and that love which leaves no room for divisions or dissensions, which overcomes strife and forgets offenses. This long-suffering charity which makes every sacrifice and overcomes all difficulties in order to be in harmony with all, because we all form ‘one body’ in Christ, because we are all children of the same heavenly father.” Fr. Gabriel, p. 203-4

 

Patient endurance of evil

Dom Gueranger comments on the existence of evil in the world and the need to overcome evil with charity in today’s Gospel by patient endurance of suffering and trust in God’s goodness.  “The kingdom of heaven, here spoken of by our Lord, is the Church militant, the society of them that believe in Him.  And yet, the field He has tilled with so much care is oversown with cockle;  heresies have crept in, scandals have abounded; are we, on that account, to have misgiving about the foresight of the Master, who knows all things, and without whose permission nothing happens?  Far from us be such a thought!  He Himself tells us that these things must needs be. Man has been gifted with free-will; it is for him to choose between good and evil.  Heresies, then, like weeds in the field, may spring up in the Church; but the day must come when they will be uprooted; some of them will wither on the parent stems, but the whole cockle shall be gathered into bundles to burn.  Where are now the heresies that sprang up in the first ages of the Church?  And in another hundred years, what will have become of the heresy, which, under the pretentious name of the ‘reformation,’ has caused incalculable evil? It is the same with scandals which rise up within the pale of the Church; they are a hard trial; but trials must come.  The divine Husbandman wills not that this cockle be torn up, lest the wheat should suffer injury. First of all, the mixture of good and bad is an advantage; it teaches the good not to put their hopes in man, but in God.  Then, too the mercy of our Lord is so great, that at times the very cockle is converted, by divine grace, into wheat.  We must therefore have patience...” Gueranger, p. 97-8.

 

Charity overcomes evil

Fr. Gabriel also comments on the need for patient understanding of God’s Providence with men: “When God asks us to endure with patience certain situations, as inevitable as they are deplorable, He asks for one of the greatest exercises of charity, compassion, and mercy.  He does not tell us to fraternize with evil, to make a league with the cockle, but He tells us to endure it with the longanimity with which He Himself endured it. ... Indeed one of the greatest opportunities for the practice of charity is  offered by those who by their evil conduct give us so many opportunities  for forgiving them for returning good for evil, and for suffering injustice for the love of God. Moreover, we should consider that, whereby cockle cannot be changed into wheat, it is always possible for the wicked to be converted and become good... When our love is perfect, we are able to live among the wicked without being harsh or contentious, without being influenced by them, but rather doing them good.” Fr. Gabriel, p. 204-5   Didn’t Jesus tell us to be good and love our enemies?  “But I say to you, love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, and pray for those who persecute and calumniate you.” Mt. 5:44

 

Goodness can come from evil

Today’s Epistle and Gospel complement one another in explaining for us the presence of evil in the world.  Because God gave man a free will and because men are persuaded by the devil to do evil, we have much evil in the world.  God allows the evil so that Christians can practice charity in all its related virtues (“...mercy, benignity, humility, modesty, patience...” Col. 3:12-13) to convert evildoers and to gain merit in heaven. So great is the reward that Christians will receive for sufferings they will undergo in this life that Jesus in the Sermon on the Mount calls them blessed and tells them that their reward will be great in heaven: “Blessed are you when men reproach you, and persecute you, and speaking falsely, say all manner of evil against you, for my sake. Rejoice and exult, because your reward is great in heaven; for so did they persecute the prophets who were before you.” Mt. 5:11-2  How great God is that He can bring good from evil as St. Augustine tells us: “For almighty God...because he is supremely good, would never allow any evil whatsoever to exist in his works if he were not so all-powerful and good as to cause good to emerge from evil itself.” Catechism of the Catholic Church, no. 311

 

 

Why are so many souls depressed and unhappy these days?

 

St. Maximilian Kolbe explains how to achieve heaven even here on earth.

 

            “In any case, those who on this earth have had a chance to taste in advance a little bit of heaven can get some idea of what it will be like.  Now everyone can have this experience.  All he needs to do is to go to confession with sincerity, diligence, a deep sorrow for his sins and a firm resolve to amend his life. He will suddenly feel a peace and happiness compared with which all the fleeting, unworthy pleasures of this world are really an odious torment.  Let everyone seek to come and receive Jesus in the Holy Eucharist with proper preparation.   Let him never permit his soul to remain in sin, but let him purify it immediately. Let him do his duty manfully. Let him address humble and frequent prayers to God’s throne, especially through the hand of the Immaculate Virgin.  Let him welcome his brethren with a charitable heart, bearing for God’s sake the sufferings and difficulties of  life.  Let him do good to all, even his enemies, solely for the love of God and not in order to be praised or even thanked by men.  Then he will come to understand what it means to have a foretaste of paradise; and perhaps more than once he will find peace and joy even in poverty, suffering, disgrace and illness.”  

 

“…regaining lost  joy ...”

 

Pope John Paul in his Apostolic Exhortation, Reconciliation and Penance, 2 December, 1984, 31, III tells us that every contrite Confession “a drawing near to the holiness of God, a rediscovery of one’s true identity, which has been upset and disturbed by sin, a liberation in the very depths of one’s self and thus a regaining of lost joy, the joy of being saved, which the majority of people in our time are no longer capable of experiencing.” 

 

 

 

 Souls in Purgatory:  November is the month in which we remember the poor souls in Purgatory who cannot help themselves.   They rely on us to shorten their time of purification.  This year, All Souls Day (Commemoration of the Faithful Departed) will be celebrated on Monday,  2 November 2015.

 

All-Souls Lists:  Please put the names of those who have died on the All-Souls list, and we will include them in our Masses during the month of November.   

 

The First Friday, 6 November 2015

 

Now is a good time to continue (or begin) the devotion to the “Nine First Fridays” of the Month.   The Sacred Heart of Jesus promised to St. Margaret Mary:  "I promise thee in the excessive mercy of My Heart that My all-powerful love will grant to all those who communicate on the First Friday in nine consecutive months, the grace of final penitence; they shall not die in My disgrace nor without receiving the Sacraments; My Divine heart shall be their safe refuge in this last moment."  There is no better way of  honouring the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus than in receiving Holy Communion on  the “Nine First Fridays.”.

 

Mission of the Immaculate Mediatrix

First Saturday:  7 November 2015

 

10:00 First Conference: 

 

11:30 AM -  Holy Mass 

 

12:30 PM- Lunch  “Pot Luck” with soup and cheese and surprises from attendees.     

 

1:45 PM-  Quiet Time:  Adoration,   Confession, Rosary & Divine Mercy Chaplet

3:10 PM-  Benediction

3:30 PM-  Second Conference on the Church in these times.

4:15-4:30 PM-  Tea and Departure

 

The Mission of the Immaculate Mediatrix (Our Lady) is to bring all souls to her Son, Jesus Christ, King of all creation.  Our Lady will destroy all His enemies (Cf. Genesis 3:15), that is, Mary will crush under her heel all who are opposed to Christ by making laws contrary to His Commandments.  On November 9, 1976 Karol Cardinal Wojtla, the future Pope John Paul II, spoke at the Eucharistic Congress in Philadelphia, Pa., USA:  We are now standing in face of the greatest historical confrontation humanity has gone through.  I do not think that the wide circles of American society or the wide circles of the Christian community realize this fully.  We are now facing the final confrontation between the Church and the Anti-Church, of the Gospel and the anti-gospel.”

 

 

The Five First Saturdays

Saturday, 7 November is the First Saturday of November. Our Lady told Sr. Lucia in 1925 “…I promise to assist at the hour of death, with all the graces necessary for salvation, all those who, on the first Saturday of five consecutive months go to confession and receive Holy Communion, recite five decades of the Rosary and keep me company for a quarter of an hour while meditating on the mysteries of the Rosary, with the intention of making reparation to me."  If only we would do what Our Lady asks, we would be assured of eternal salvation.  Our Lady promises us all the graces necessary for our salvation if we keep The Five First Saturdays! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Feast of All Saints, 1 November 2015


The Feast of All Saints

 Sunday, 1 November 2015

 

 After this I saw a great multitude which no man could number, out of all nations and tribes and peoples and tongues, standing before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed in white robes, and with palms in their hands.”  Rev.7:9

 

            Dom Prosper Gueranger in his book, The Liturgical Year Vol. 15, tells us that the Feast of  All Saints commemorates all those souls in heaven who have not been officially recognized by the Church as Saints:  “Time is no more; it is the human race eternally saved that is  thus presented in a vision to the prophet of Patmos (St. John, author of the Book of Revelation). Our life of struggle and suffering on earth is, then, to have an end.  Our long-lost race is to fill up the angelic ranks thinned by Satan’s revolt; and, uniting in the gratitude of the redeemed of the Lamb, the faithful spirits will sing with us: ‘Thanksgiving, honour, and power, and strength to our God for ever and ever.’” Rev. 7:12  Gueranger, p. 57.  These elect souls  have lived good lives by loving God and their neighbours and obeying God’s Commandments, and they are now enjoying the delights of heaven.  Have you ever really considered what heaven is like? Today, many people only think of this life and forget that God has prepared a place of great happiness for all those who love him.  St. Paul tells us, “Eye has not seen, or ear    heard nor has it entered into the heart of man what things God has prepared for those who love him.” I Cor. 2:9

 

The Beatific Vision

            The primary joy of heaven is seeing God face to face. This is such a great joy that it is the basis for all the  other joys of heaven. Without the Beatific Vision heaven would not be heaven. We can only imagine what God’s beauty must be like. He who created this world so beautiful what must He be like as He is the creator of this world’s beauty? St. Paul tells us: “For the invisible things of him, from the creation of the world, are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made...” Rom 1:20 Thus the Beatific vision, which is the essential reward of the blessed, is seeing One God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit  with all His power, majesty and beauty.  Then in the light of God’s glory is the beauty first of all of Our Lady, the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Mother of God who has prayed and given the saints and ourselves all the graces necessary to gain heaven. She is the Queen of Angels and Saints.  Then there are the multitude of angelic hosts and  the many canonized saints to whom we have prayed for many favours.  Then there will be all of our loved ones and our relatives of many generations and friends whom we have known  on earth and who have been awaiting our entrance into heaven these many years.  It will be the most wonderful reunion possible for all peoples from all times.

 

A Place of Light and Space

Heaven will be a vast place of light and space where the souls of the just with their glorified bodies will go after the Last Judgment. It will be the heavenly Jerusalem built as a city which will be brighter than the sun with all manner of precious stones and gold: “Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth; for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away ...Behold I make all things new.” Rev. 21:4  As nothing on earth is more pleasing than light, heaven will be brighter than anything we have seen on earth. It will also be vast  and filled with peace:  “O Israel, how great is the House of God and how vast is the place of his possession.” Baruch 3:24  The same lovely things of earth: flowers, trees, fruits, etc. will be in  the gardens of heaven.

 

Qualities of the Glorified Body

Our glorified bodies will shine brightly according to the amount of sanctifying grace in our soul. The quality of brightness will correspond to the amount of grace in the soul: “Those that teach others unto justice shall shine like the stars for all eternity.” Dan. 12:3 The glorified body will also have the gift of impassability by which it will not be capable of suffering nor will it ever be sick or tired or grow old or hungry or thirsty.  The glorified body will have the quality of agility as it will  be able to move any place with a mere thought and without any fatigue.  The body will also have the gift of subtlety by which it will be able to move through any material.  The body which has mortified itself of pleasure for the love of God on earth will be filled with pleasure for all the senses: the sense of sight will be given all the beauty and delights of heaven; the soul will hear the beautiful music of the heavenly choirs of angels for their ears; the sense of taste will be satisfied in ways which we cannot imagine: “Thou shalt make them drink of the torrents of thy pleasure” Ps. 35:9; the sense of smell will be pleased with the aromas of delight; and the sense of touch and feeling will experience comfort and enjoyment which, according to St. Anselm, will provide a wondrous sense of peace and contentment.

 

Bond of Charity

All the glorified souls in heaven will be united in a great bond of charity.  They will be re-united with all their loved ones on earth, and as there will be no imperfections in heaven, everyone will love everyone else perfectly even if they did not do so on earth. How could heaven have any disagreements or hatreds? All these weaknesses would have been purged away in Purgatory before entrance into heaven “without spot or wrinkle”  Eph. 5:27 Those in heaven will know and love everyone else as brothers and sisters know one another on earth.  Each will read the other’s heart and see the mutual love. More especially, there will be great love for those who  have been responsible for them to get to heaven.  “O God, how unspeakable will be the blessed of heaven.” 

 

Spiritual Joys of the Soul

The soul which is comprised of the memory, understanding and will shall have a perfect happiness. The memory will recall the events of life and exult in God’s care for it during its life.  The understanding (intellect) will know all created things in the light of God; all natural and supernatural mysteries of our faith and the scriptures will be known.  The will, the noblest of the soul’s faculties, will be confirmed in love for God and all the saints and angels. Now all the soul’s desires will be ordered to God and His glory:  “We know that when he shall appear we shall be like him, because we shall see him as he is.” I Jn. 3:2  As there is no greater happiness on earth than to love and be loved, so in heaven the love of God for the soul and soul for God and all other souls will be boundless.

Live for heaven

While we have time on earth, let us live for eternity.  Let us work for the salvation of souls. Let us pray and sacrifice as Our Lady said at Fatima, “For many souls will go to hell for no one prays and sacrifices for them.”  If we pray and sacrifice now, many souls will be in heaven because of our efforts. Let us call to mind the words of St. Pio of Pietrelcina, “...Let us always think of heaven.”  Let us remember and never   forget  what St. Paul said:  “Eye has not seen, ear has not heard, nor has it entered the mind of man what God has prepared for those who love Him.”  I Cor. 2:9 (cf.  Is. 64:4

 

 

Souls in Purgatory:  November is the month in which we remember the poor souls in Purgatory who cannot help themselves.   They rely on us to shorten their time of purification.  This year, All Souls Day (Commemoration of the Faithful Departed) will be celebrated on Monday,  2 November 2015.

 

All-Souls Lists:  Please put the names of those who have died on the All-Souls list, and we will include them in our Masses during the month of November.   

 

The First Friday, 6 November 2015

 

Now is a good time to continue (or begin) the devotion to the “Nine First Fridays” of the Month.   The Sacred Heart of Jesus promised to St. Margaret Mary:  "I promise thee in the excessive mercy of My Heart that My all-powerful love will grant to all those who communicate on the First Friday in nine consecutive months, the grace of final penitence; they shall not die in My disgrace nor without receiving the Sacraments; My Divine heart shall be their safe refuge in this last moment."  There is no better way of  honouring the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus than in receiving Holy Communion on  the “Nine First Fridays.”.

 

Mission of the Immaculate Mediatrix

First Saturday:  7 November 2015

 

10:00 First Conference: 

 

11:30 AM -  Holy Mass 

 

12:30 PM- Lunch  “Pot Luck” with soup and cheese and surprises from attendees.     

 

1:45 PM-  Quiet Time:  Adoration,   Confession, Rosary & Divine Mercy Chaplet

3:10 PM-  Benediction

3:30 PM-  Second Conference on the Church in these times.

4:15-4:30 PM-  Tea and Departure

 

The Mission of the Immaculate Mediatrix (Our Lady) is to bring all souls to her Son, Jesus Christ, King of all creation.  Our Lady will destroy all His enemies (Cf. Genesis 3:15), that is, Mary will crush under her heel all who are opposed to Christ by making laws contrary to His Commandments.  On November 9, 1976 Karol Cardinal Wojtla, the future Pope John Paul II, spoke at the Eucharistic Congress in Philadelphia, Pa., USA:  We are now standing in face of the greatest historical confrontation humanity has gone through.  I do not think that the wide circles of American society or the wide circles of the Christian community realize this fully.  We are now facing the final confrontation between the Church and the Anti-Church, of the Gospel and the anti-gospel.”

 

 

The Five First Saturdays

Saturday, 1 November is the First Saturday of November. Our Lady told Sr. Lucia in 1925 “…I promise to assist at the hour of death, with all the graces necessary for salvation, all those who, on the first Saturday of five consecutive months go to confession and receive Holy Communion, recite five decades of the Rosary and keep me company for a quarter of an hour while meditating on the mysteries of the Rosary, with the intention of making reparation to me."  If only we would do what Our Lady asks, we would be assured of eternal salvation.  Our Lady promises us all the graces necessary for our salvation if we keep The Five First Saturdays! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feast of Christ the King, 25 October 2015


Last Sunday of October

25 October 2015

Feast of Christ the King

 

 “The Lamb that  was slain is worthy to receive power  and divinity and  wisdom and power and honour: to Him be glory and empire for ever and ever.”  Rev. 5:12 &  1:6

 

Firstborn of  All Creatures

Jesus is the firstborn of all creatures.  He gives the Father the greatest glory as Man because He is true God and loves the Father infinitely as God, the Son.   This is why the Father is so pleased with His Son.  Christ is the King for all eternity because He has given Himself for our ransom and has won for us our eternal salvation: “The Lord will reign forever and will give his people the gift of peace.Ps. 28: 10-11  Jesus Christ is the “Son of Man” as He is both God and man.  He is the first-born of all creatures and as such  He gives the Father the greatest glory.   This is why He is the “King of Kings” and the “Lord of Lords.”  He is Christ the King of all nations and tribes: “He has rescued us from the power of darkness and transferred us into the kingdom of  his beloved Son, in whom we have our redemption, the remission of our sins. He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of every creature. For in him were created all things in the heavens and on the earth, things visible and invisible...” Col. 1: 13-16

 

He Has Redeemed Us

“(Jesus Christ) faithful witness, first-born of the dead and ruler of the Kings of the earth.”  Rev. 1:5.  Christ is the faithful witness who has given His life and “washed us from our sins in His own blood.” Rev. 1:5   All creation looks to Him as He is the Alpha and Omega,” (Rev. 1:8) the beginning and the end of all things.  All things are measured by His great sacrifice for He has conquered death and redeemed us of our sins.  To Him belong glory and dominion forever and ever.”  Rev. 1:6 

 

Jesus Christ is King, Priest and Victim

The Preface for the Feast of Christ the King (Ordinary Form) echoes the theme of Christ’s Kingship: “that we should at all times and in all places give thanks to Thee, holy Lord, Father almighty, eternal God:  Who with the oil of gladness didst anoint Thine  only-begotten Son our Lord Jesus Christ as Priest for ever and King of all.” (Preface)     Jesus is our eternal High Priest and King of Kings forever: “That offering Himself on the altar of the Cross a stainless Victim to appease Thee, He might accomplish the mysteries of man’s redemption...” (Preface)  He is not only our King, but He is also our Priest who has sacrificed Himself for our sins.  By His sacrifice, we are redeemed for His eternal kingdom in heaven: “and that subjecting all creatures to His sway, He might present to Thine infinite Majesty a universal and eternal Kingdom; a Kingdom of truth and life; a Kingdom of holiness and grace: a Kingdom of justice and peace.” (Preface)  To obtain this Kingdom, St. Paul told us we must be “without spot or wrinkle.” (Eph. 5: 27) 

 

Tragic Choice of Modern Man

The nations of the world tragically reject the Kingship of Christ with their immoral opposition to God’s Divine laws.  Many nations today have legalized practices which are opposed to the Ten Commandments: abortion, divorce, contraception, same sex marriages, and euthanasia.    With these sins against God’s Commandments, the world has chosen Satan, the Prince of this World, as their leader (king). This choice can only lead to tragedy for all of us in this world.  People no longer believe in truth and think that they can do what they want; they no longer believe in the eternal truths of heaven, hell and judgment; they deny the Church’s teachings on life and marriage and fail to procreate the children that God wishes to give the world. “Without a deep reverence for the sacredness of life, humanity places itself on the path of self-destruction.” (Bishop Sean O’Malley of Fall River, Ma. USA, In Vitro Fertilization)   

 

 

Christ the King Must Reign in Our World and in Us All

When Pope Pius XI instituted this feast in 1925 with his decree,  Quas Primas,” he wanted to remind us that Jesus Christ must reign as King in our minds, our hearts, and in our wills if we want peace and happiness in this world.  “He must reign in our minds which should assent with perfect submission and firm belief to revealed truths and to the doctrines of Christ. He must reign in our wills, which should obey the laws and precepts of God. He must reign in our hearts, which should spurn natural desire and love God above all things, and cleave to Him alone.  He must reign in our bodies and in our members which should serve as instruments for the interior sanctification of our souls.”(#21)   Jesus has created us, He has redeemed us, He has sanctified us with His Flesh and Blood, He governs us with love and protection, and He has prepared a place for us in His heavenly Kingdom if we are faithful to His commandments. He will come to judge us in His glory and power.  If we choose Him as our King today, we need not fear that He will refuse us His kingdom in Heaven for all eternity.

 

 

 

The Feast of All Souls,

 Monday 2 November 2015

 

Souls in Purgatory:  November is the month in which we remember the poor souls in Purgatory who cannot help themselves.   They rely on us to shorten their time of purification. Saturday, 2 November 2013 is the Commemoration of All the Faithful Departed or All Souls Day.  Mass is at 7:30 AM as usual.

 

All-Souls Lists:  Please put the names of those who have died on the All-Souls list, and we will include them in our Masses during the month of November . 

 

 The First Friday, 6 October  2015

Now is a good time to continue (or begin) the devotion to the “Nine First Fridays” of the Month.   The Sacred Heart of Jesus promised to St. Margaret Mary:  "I promise thee in the excessive mercy of My Heart that My all-powerful love will grant to all those who communicate on the First Friday in nine consecutive months, the grace of final penitence; they shall not die in My disgrace nor without receiving the Sacraments; My Divine heart shall be their safe refuge in this last moment."  There is no better way of  honouring the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus than in receiving Holy Communion on  the “Nine First Fridays.”.

 

 

 

 

Mission of the Immaculate Mediatrix

First Saturday:  7 November 2015

 

10:00 First Conference: 

 

11:30 AM -  Holy Mass  

 

12:30 PM- Lunch  “Pot Luck” with soup and cheese and surprises from attendees.      

 

1:45 PM-  Quiet Time:  Adoration,   Confession, Rosary & Divine Mercy Chaplet

3:10 PM-  Benediction

3:30 PM-  Second Conference on the Church in these times.

4:15-4:30 PM-  Tea and Departure

 

The Mission of the Immaculate Mediatrix (Our Lady) is to bring all souls to her Son, Jesus Christ, King of all creation.  Our Lady will destroy all His enemies (Cf. Genesis 3:15), that is, Mary will crush under her heel all who are opposed to Christ by making laws contrary to His Commandments.  On November 9, 1976 Karol Cardinal Wojtla, the future Pope John Paul II, spoke at the Eucharistic Congress in Philadelphia, Pa., USA:  We are now standing in face of the greatest historical confrontation humanity has gone through.  I do not think that the wide circles of American society or the wide circles of the Christian community realize this fully.  We are now facing the final confrontation between the Church and the Anti-Church, of the Gospel and the anti-gospel.”

 

 

The Five First Saturdays

Saturday, 1 November is the First Saturday of November. Our Lady told Sr. Lucia in 1925 “…I promise to assist at the hour of death, with all the graces necessary for salvation, all those who, on the first Saturday of five consecutive months go to confession and receive Holy Communion, recite five decades of the Rosary and keep me company for a quarter of an hour while meditating on the mysteries of the Rosary, with the intention of making reparation to me."  If only we would do what Our Lady asks, we would be assured of eternal salvation.  Our Lady promises us all the graces necessary for our salvation if we keep The Five First Saturdays!